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Victoria: New Plan To Tackle Rising Rural Road Toll Photo:
 
 
Trevor Collett | Oct, 06 2014 | 8 Comments

Victoria Police has launched a four-year plan aiming to tackle the over-representation of rural Victorians in road toll statistics.

The Vic Police say country Victorians are three times more likely to be killed and 40 percent more likely to be seriously injured on the state’s roads than their city counterparts.

The new plan - called The Safer Country Roads Plan 2014-2018 - aims to reduce the rural road toll in line with Victoria’s ‘Road to Zero’ road-safety vision.

Road to Zero aims to reduce road deaths in the state to less than 200 by the end of 2022, while also aiming to reduce serious injuries to less than 3850.

The plan includes a ‘safe systems’ approach to policing, improved number plate recognition and speed detection technology and increased drug and drink-driving enforcement.

Further issues include the promotion of driver fatigue awareness, improving driver education and a focus on off-road motorcycle use.

The plan was launched as the rural road toll passed the 100-mark for 2014, continuing a trend of rising fatality figures seen midway through last year.

“Speeding and drink driving are challenges we face across the state and it’s also concerning that one in every seven people killed on country roads last year were not wearing a seatbelt,” Assistant Commissioner Robert Hill said.

“These issues are compounded when combined with high average speeds, longer travel distances, and rural roads - you have an absolute disaster waiting to happen.”

The rural road toll in Victoria for 2013 was 141, with around two-thirds of all deaths on country roads occurring in 100km/h zones.

Victoria’s overall road toll for 2014 is on track for an increase over 2013, currently up 6.9 percent over the same time last year with 187 deaths recorded.

MORE News & Reviews: Victoria | Police | Speed Cameras | Road Toll

 
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