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F1: Schumacher Injured In Skiing Fall, In Critical Condition After Surgery Photo:
 
 
TMR Team | Dec, 30 2013 | 0 Comments

Michael Schumacher has been injured while skiing in France this weekend. The incident occurred off-piste at the Meribel ski resort, where the seven time world champion has a chalet.

Former Ferrari and Mercedes driver Schumacher, 44, was wearing a helmet while skiing with his 14-year-old son when he fell and struck his head on a rock.

The German was airlifted to hospital, according to resort director Christophe Gernignon-Lecomte.

"He was in shock, a little agitated, but conscious," he is quoted by RMC Sport. "It could possibly be a cranial injury but it is not very serious."

The hospital later confirmed in a statement that Schumacher had suffered "a severe injury with coma," requiring "immediately neurosurgical interventional".

Speaking to his manager Sabine Kehm, major daily paper Bild reported: "There is no danger to his life!"

Kehm said: "We ask for your understanding that we cannot give continuous information about his health. He was wearing a helmet and was not alone."

 

Ferrari 'not necessarily' good move for Vettel - Ecclestone

Sebastian Vettel has been voted sportsman of the year by European news agencies.

Organised by the Polish news agency PAP, 21 European outlets cast their votes and the Red Bull driver emerged with more points than tennis' Rafael Nadal, and British athlete Mo Farah.

Vettel's latest victory is despite widespread claims that the German is only dominating F1 because of Adrian Newey's design genius.

But rival Felipe Massa told Brazil's Totalrace: "It (Vettel's dominance) is because of his talent, no doubt.

"He is an excellent driver who deserves everything he has achieved.

"Many people say he wins only because he has the best car. He does (have the best car), but the work he has done is amazing and if he continues to have a competitive car, he will win more," added Massa.

Vettel's new status as arguably F1's very best driver is also supported by his traditional ally and friend Bernie Ecclestone.

The 26-year-old driver's popularity, however, is another matter, particularly after he was repeatedly booed on post-race podiums in 2013.

"He created this reputation himself when he went ahead of Mark Webber in Malaysia," F1's chief executive told Italy's La Gazzetta dello Sport.

"Now some see him as a person that really he is not. But I don't think he did anything wrong to Mark."

Vettel has committed his medium-term future to Red Bull, but Ecclestone thinks the German will eventually move elsewhere.

"He is young and he won't stay for forever where he is," the 83-year-old Briton said.

"The problem is that all the drivers want to finish their careers at Ferrari, which isn't good," Ecclestone argued.

"I think he should go to the team that can help him win more titles, and that will not necessarily be Ferrari."

(GMM)

 

Winning won't drive Red Bull out of F1 - Ecclestone

Bernie Ecclestone is not worried Red Bull's run of dominance will drive the brand out of formula one.

The energy drink company's premier F1 team and its lead driver Sebastian Vettel have won the past four drivers' and constructors' championships -- so dominantly in 2013 that many questioned the spectacle of the latest triumph.

But when asked if Red Bull is so successful it may eventually tire both of winning and the sport in general, F1 chief executive Ecclestone answered: "I don't think so.

"Dietrich Mateschitz is so competitive, he loves racing, he likes when his car wins," the 83-year-old told Italy's La Gazzetta dello Sport.

"The successes of recent years also mean his team has earned much more than some of the others.

"Not only that, where else is he going to find as good a platform to advertise his brand?" Ecclestone wondered.

Red Bull is among the teams with the very highest budgets in F1; so high that many others are struggling to pay their bills in a difficult economic climate.

Ecclestone has little sympathy.

"The teams are spending too much," he said. "Look at the top teams; they have a huge number of staff, 700 or more, no one knows the exact numbers.

"All these people to put two cars on the grid on Sundays. It's ridiculous," Ecclestone added.

At the same time, teams are struggling to attract big brands to their sponsorship liveries, while F1 has managed to do deals with companies like UBS and Rolex.

Asked why the teams are failing to do the same, Ecclestone answered: "I don't know -- ask them."

Meanwhile, when asked to tip the 2014 winner, he responded similarly: "I don't know. I think next year will depend most on the engine.

"The winner will be the one with the best engine."

(GMM)

 

Webber got 'tired' of Vettel's winning - Vergne

Mark Webber quit formula one because he got tired of being beaten by teammate Sebastian Vettel.

That is the claim of Jean-Eric Vergne, who drives for the second-tier Red Bull team, Toro Rosso.

Frenchman Vergne told Spain's El Confidencial newspaper that he is now over the disappointment of missing out on the departing Webber's seat at the premier Red Bull Racing team to his 2013 teammate Daniel Ricciardo.

Vergne, 23, was asked if he thinks Australian veteran Webber, who is heading to Le Mans with Porsche, quit F1 because he got "tired" of spraying champagne on F1 podiums.

"I don't think he got tired of that," Vergne answered. "He got tired of his teammate winning all the time. And another year of the same made no sense to him.

"He would not even be happy if his team continued to win everything -- you have the same car but you're beaten every weekend by your teammate. You would get tired of that," he added, "even when you are on the podium.

"I think Mark is a very good driver and a true competitor," Vergne explained, "but things were not going as he wanted.

"If your teammate is always beating you ... the goal is to win, not finish on the podium," he added.

Vergne was also asked about F1's sweeping changes for 2014, and he admitted that the move to the new turbo V6 engine will be "the main issue" for the season.

But he added: "There are many other changes. The (blown) exhausts will be gone, the tyres will be harder. Traction will be extremely difficult and sometimes it will seem like children learning how to drive!"

And Vergne tipped Pirelli to recover from its tumultuous season, despite the fact Nico Rosberg suffered a high-speed blowout whilst testing a 2014 prototype in Bahrain recently.

"I think they will do a good job. First of all the tyres must be safe," said Vergne. "They will be more conservative."

(GMM)

 
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