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Unearthed: 1968 Maserati Ghibli Barn-find Bound For Auction Photo:
 
 
TMR Team | Mar, 20 2013 | 5 Comments

A 1968 Maserati Ghibli - yes, the name of the new one has a history - has been rescued from a barn in South Africa where it has spent the last fourteen years.

Luckily for any prospective buyer, the 'Maser' has been stored in a bodywork-friendly environment free from moisture.

The Ghibli, also known by its codename Tipo 155, is one of Maserati's more recognisable machines and at the time was Maserati's most popular - outselling the Ferrari Daytona and Lamborghini Miura.

Designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, who was at the time chief designer at Ghia, the car was released in 1967 after its debut at the 1966 Turin Motor Show.

The Ghibli's heart is a quad-cam 4.7 litre V8 good for 241kW, fed by four Weber carbs.

The chassis is a mix of Quattroporte and Mexico bits, made up of tubular steel and shortened by 9cm. Its live rear axle was suspended by distinctly old-tech leaf springs, but it did have four-wheel disc brakes.

With a five-speed manual transmission, the graceful coupe could hit 100km/h in 6.8 seconds and go on to a top speed of 248km/h. Also available was a three-speed auto.

It was a thirsty machine, prompting Maserati to fit twin tanks, Mini Cooper S-style, for a total of 100 litres. They have to be filled separately.

At just 116cm in height (46 inches), you may have to be on the shorter side to squeeze into the Ghibli.

Production ran from 1967 through to 1973, with 1,150 coupes and 125 convertible Spyders finding homes. Twenty-five of the coupes were slightly more powerful Ghibli SS models, with an extra 11kW.

Silverstone Auctions, who will put the car on the block on May 17th, say the car is worth between $18,000 and $24,000 in its current state, but with a full restoration could be worth a lot more.

If only the same owner had a couple of Falcon GTHOs hidden away...

 
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