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Ferrari Looks To Cut Emissions With All-Hybrid And Turbo Future: Report Photo:
 
 
Trevor Collett | Jun, 27 2014 | 7 Comments

Ferrari is working to cut its overall carbon dioxide emissions by up to 20 percent, and reports this week suggest a suite of efficiency technologies will guide the way.

The supercar company has set a deadline of 2021 to achieve the CO2 cut at an average of three percent per year, and is reportedly looking to turbocharging and hybrid technology in all future models.

Under the ‘greener’ Ferrari plan, all models for the foreseeable future would be powered by either a turbocharged V8 engine or a V12 hybrid power plant.

The added bonus of an all-turbo and all-hybrid future for Ferrari is that performance is unlikely to suffer, while engines can continue to shrink in size and improve in efficiency.

"Our average CO2 emissions are currently about 270 grams of CO2 per kilometre,” Ferrari Powertrain Director Vittorio Dini said, speaking with Automotive News Europe.

“We want to use all the available technologies to reduce emissions by three percent each year, which means approximately a 20 percent decrease by 2021."

Mr Dini said Ferrari’s average CO2 emissions have already fallen by around 40 percent from an output of 435g/km in 2007.

Ferrari can bypass the CO2 targets that parent company Fiat Chrysler Automobiles must adhere to, as Dini says the Italian icon has negotiated its own targets with the European Union as a stand-alone, low-volume carmaker.

The prancing horse currently produces around 7000 units per year, but last year Ferrari Chairman Luca di Montezemolo said the company wanted to boost margins without increasing sales, potentially pointing to an even lower output in the future.

The greener Ferrari of tomorrow has arguably begun to arrive with the new turbocharged California T; a model which is now available in Australia.

MORE: Ferrari news and reviews

 
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