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Aston?s New DB Car Due In 2016: Report Photo:
 
 
Mike Stevens | Jun, 24 2014 | 1 Comment

Aston Martin will unveil an all-new successor to the 10 year-old DB9 in 2016, according to new reports out of the UK this week.

The name of the new model is still to be confirmed, however. Reports suggest Aston is reluctant to continue its current path by introducing a ‘DB10’ badge. DBX, perhaps?

On the mechanical front, it is known that next-generation Aston models will be powered by AMG-sourced V8 engines - possibly including the new 4.0 litre turbo engine revealed this month ahead of the AMG GT coupe’s unveiling.

Other Mercedes and AMG technologies are expected to come to Aston as part of its new partnership, meaning that next-generation safety and convenience systems will help to modernise the British brand’s range.

A versatile new platform will underpin the new DB car, allowing Aston to follow the DB9’s replacement with new Vantage and Vanquish models in 2018 and 2019 respectively, the UK’s Autocar reports.

That schedule could see the current Vantage models retired before their replacements arrive, with the V8 model now into its ninth year on the market.

“We will, in the next few years, be implementing the biggest investment program in our 101-year history, preparing the ground for new and exciting products in the future,” Aston Martin’s Hanno Kirner said in April.

A replacement for the four-door Rapide is likely also on the cards, although Autocar reports that such a model is not expected to appear until closer to 2020.

The company’s so-called Lagonda SUV remains far from production certainty however, with the company’s latest funds injection focused almost entirely on rejuvenating its sports line.

For now, we can expect the DB9’s replacement to appear in the second half of 2016, ahead of a global 2017 sales launch.

Pictured top of article: the newly styled Vanquish.

MORE: Aston Martin reviews

 
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