Trevor Collett | Apr 19, 2016

The twin earthquakes that rocked southern Japan on the weekend, one a 7.3-magnitude, have claimed their first automotive casualties.

Both Honda and Toyota have announced that production will be affected by the quake, with the latter believed to be the hardest hit.

Bloomberg reports Toyota could see a downturn in profits to the tune of 30 billion yen (AU$357 million), as a disruption in parts supply forces a slow-down in manufacturing.

The carmaker said its Kyushu plant has already ground to a halt, with other plants expected to follow during the week.

Around 56,000 Toyota and Lexus vehicles will be delayed or simply never built, along with 7500 Daihatsus. The ‘ripple effect’ from the downturn also stretches to engine parts suppliers and auto electrical companies - including Mitsubishi Electronics.

Daihatsu Copen
Daihatsu Copen

For Honda, its motorcycle plant in Kumamoto has ceased production until at least the end of this week, having already extended its original three-day stoppage.

Honda’s other plants will continue as normal for now, as will the manufacturing facilities for Subaru and Mazda.

Nissan experienced a minor disruption to its production schedule, but was expected to recommence carmaking this week.

However, Mazda, Nissan and Subaru have all left the door open to stoppages if parts suppliers are unable to fill orders.

Toyota will now implement its ‘disaster plan’ - devised following the 2011 earthquakes in Japan - to minimise financial damage from the weekend’s quakes.

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Toyota | Honda | Japan

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