2014 Isuzu MU-X Review

Tim O'Brien | 54 Comments

ISUZU MU-X REVIEW

What’s hot: Robust build, proven drivetrain, spacious seven-seater.
What’s not: Perhaps a tad too-softly sprung, hollow plastics.
X-FACTOR: Gutsy 4X4 capability with a family-friendly, comfortable interior - Isuzu’s MU-X is an SUV for ‘the big trek’.

Price: from $40,500 (prices may yet change)
Engine/Trans: 3.0 DOHC diesel | 5spd auto (and 5spd manual)
Power/Torque: 130kW/380Nm
Fuel Use listed l/100km: 2WD: 8.2, 4X4: 8.4 | tested: 8.7 l/100km


OVERVIEW

Let’s cut to the chase here; the Isuzu MU-X makes a much better ‘first impression’ than Holden’s Colorado 7. Much, much better.

For style, the MU-X has the awkward-looking Colorado 7 shot to bits. You’d hardly know they shared a design genesis; front, side, rear, Isuzu’s MU-X is more cohesive, balanced and appealing.

The drivetrain too is better: less powerful and with one less ratio, but quieter, more refined and with a ‘fat’ useable torque band.

Suspension feel is also better; the MU-X is softer and with a ‘longer travel’ feel. Its articulation off-road is like an old Range Rover.

The isolation in the cabin, and the way it sits flat and still while the wheels do the work down below, is very impressive indeed.

And the accommodation is better; it’s still a bit plasticky but is better finished and has some detail touches absent on the Colorado 7. It doesn’t feel as cheap inside, or as drab, as the Colorado.

Lastly, on the strength of our first foray at the wheel, it would seem to have the very capable Colorado 7 also covered in the rough stuff.

And for most of the above, ditto Mitsubishi’s ageing Challenger.

And Ford’s Territory? Though certainly superior to the MU-X on road - and you’d choose the 2WD Territory over the 2WD MU-X every time - the Territory AWD has none of the heavy-duty off-road capability of the MU-X 4X4.

We drove Isuzu’s new MU-X at its Thailand launch, both the 2WD and 4X4 models. We think Isuzu has hatched a pretty good one here.

THE INTERIOR

Open the door and you’re faced with a familiar interior. The styling and layout echoes the Colorado 7, and also - although the controls are different - the D-Max.

But while the Colorado is overwhelmingly grey throughout, the MU-X is a much darker charcoal and looks the better for it. The darker tone makes it look less like a commercial interior.

Like the Colorado 7 however, it’s not the last word in style, nor the last word in construction.

While the leather-wrapped steering wheel is pretty good - a soft rim and the right size, though not ‘reach’ adjustable - most of the other touch-points are hollow and hard.

Like the console lid, the flat rising armrests, and the dash and instrument binnacle: all have a Tupperware feel like they might have been lifted from a commercial vehicle, not a family SUV.

But there’s no doubting the snug fit and feel of durability. The MU-X feels as tight as drum; inside and out you get a sense it will outlast the pyramids.

There’s also no complaint with the accommodation. The leather seats in the top of the range MU-X LS-T we drove are comfortable, easily adjusted and with enough shape to hold the bum in place when at odd angles off-road.

There is also good kneeroom in the second row, and enough room in the third row for a couple of adults (although a long trip would be out of the question).

Unlike the Mitsubishi Challenger, for instance, the third row in the MU-X has a scalloped footwell so that taller passengers there won’t need to have their knees tucked under their chins.

Access too is good, and the second row can be tumbled forward to open up a really large accessible cargo area (with the third row folded flat).

And there’s no shortage of features. All in the range get air-con, pollen filter, power windows, keyless entry, cruise control, rear park assist, CD/MP3 audio system with six speakers, Bluetooth, iPod and USB connectivity, aux-in, leather-wrapped steering wheel, 60/40 split-fold second-row seats, 50/50 split-fold third-row seats and adjustable headrests for all seats, among a longer list of features.

The top-spec LS-T also gets sat-nav with live traffic updates, DVD player (roof-mounted screen), reversing camera and climate control air-con (also standard for LS-U models).

ON THE ROAD

Isuzu does things a bit differently in Thailand. The launch program was scripted like a school picnic.

For the ‘on-road’ part of the drive, we were bussed to Bridgestone’s tyre testing facility east of Bangkok. Our time at the wheel there was limited to a few repeated runs around a marked circuit.

And we drove only the five-speed auto, not the manual.

So take these impressions as just that, impressions. We’ll need a longer run to really assess the strengths and weaknesses of the MU-X on road.

That said, we were impressed. The 130kW and 380Nm 3.0 litre turbo diesel ‘four’ under the bonnet is a known quantity. Isuzu’s built-for-work diesels are renowned for their longevity and reliability.

With a stainless steel timing chain, roller rockers and under-stressed to buggery, this is one of the best diesels you will find in a family SUV. It’s the same proven unit you’ll find in the D-Max ute.

It’s not quiet - you’re aware it’s a diesel - but quiet enough. It seems well-matched to the five-speed auto (with direct drive on fourth gear) and responds eagerly to a prod on the accelerator... not greatly different to the D-Max ute.

This diesel might be built for work, and a lot of it (it’s rated to 500,000+km), and while it doesn’t spin as freely as a little Euro diesel, it pulls strongly from lazy lower-down revs.

We also drove the 2WD LS-U round the Bridgestone circuit. For on-road balance, it feels much the same as the 4WD LS-T, although slightly more nimble thanks to a little less weight over the front wheels.

Again, we’d need to put 2WD and 4WD models alongside each other to really be sure of the call.

Down below there is a sophisticated ‘double wishbone’ independent front suspension and a five-link coil-sprung rear. It works really well off-road, supple and with extended articulation, but may be a tad ‘soft’ for the highway.

There’s a fair amount of lean on the outside front wheel going into corners and the weight transference at the back-end is quite apparent on exit, especially in left-right cornering.

That said, from the rear seats (I took a few quick runs with a colleague), it doesn’t feel at all fussed and is a genuinely comfortable, compliant ride.

It is off-road though where the MU-X really delivers and where the long wheel travel really makes sense.

OFF-ROAD

This is a very impressive performer off road.

The articulation down below, and the ‘lugging’ low-speed capability of the torquey unstressed diesel under the bonnet, allows the MU-X to creep over quite challenging terrain.

We put it through its paces on Isuzu’s off-road track south-east of Bangkok. It’s a ‘controlled’ environment: steep, deep washouts and some challenging angles, but in reality no substitute for the vagaries of a steep fire trail.

That said, the MU-X is near unstoppable. In the manual, we idled in first ‘low’ - the tacho showing under 800rpm and the right foot kept off the accelerator - up and over a near-40 degree incline.

That was impressive.

We stepped it through a bed of rocks: while a lot was going on down below, anyone in the passenger seat would barely have known.

The MU-X’s extended wheel travel allows the chassis to sit relatively flat and free of the rapid ‘left-right pitching’ that can occur in stiffer suspensions allowing less vertical movement.

The auto performed equally impressively. In many ways, an auto is better off-road as it can be more easily crept.

The auto in the MU-X 4X4 also comes with adaptive grade logic and hill-ascent and descent control. Over the steepest pinch on the Isuzu track, a 47 degree incline up and down, the MU-X auto was untroubled.

Its approach and departure angles - 30.1 and 25.1 degrees (LS-U and LS-T 4X4 models) - are very good, as is the ramp-over angle of 22.6 degrees.

Similarly, although appearing to sit high and a little tippy-toed, as our photos show, the MU-X can traverse safely at challenging lean-angles without roll-over.

I think the only thing we wondered about was whether the front suspension may allow a little too much ‘give’ when settling.

If you’re going to dent a sill, it’s when the suspension wallows as the weight comes down on it after stepping off something high that will do it.

All in all though, it’s hard not to be impressed with the MU-X, both manual and auto.

And with that tough-as-nails Isuzu commercial drivetrain doing the work, you know it will take a lot of punishment without complaint.

We really look forward to trying it out over some of our long and challenging fire trails in Victoria’s high country.

FIRST DRIVE VERDICT

Yes, we think Isuzu has a good SUV in its MU-X. While certain to appeal to families for its price, seven-seat comfort, robustness and capability, you would have to think it’s going to really do well with fleet buyers.

It’s strong, it’s well-featured and it feels unbreakable.

More to the point, the Isuzu’s diesel engine and transmissions are built primarily for commercial applications. You won’t find this transmission overheating when dragging a heavy load - it’s built for it.

It’s also comfortable at the wheel, pretty quiet and looks reasonably smart - and comes with a five year/130,000km warranty (and roadside assist).

When it arrives in December, look out for Isuzu’s MU-X. You won’t have to spend $70k to get a good, strong, heavy-duty 4X4 for the big round-Australia trip with the caravan in tow. The MU-X will do it, no problem.

Prices (preliminary pricing only)

Isuzu confirms these prices are preliminary and may yet changed before the MU-X's December launch.

The Isuzu MU-X will come with a 5 year/130,000km New Vehicle Warranty.

  • MU-X 4x2 LS-M auto - $40,500
  • MU-X 4x2 LS-U auto - $42,000
  • MU-X 4x4 LS-M man - $45,600
  • MU-X 4x4 LS-M auto - $47,800
  • MU-X 4x4 LS-U man - $47,100
  • MU-X 4x4 LS-U auto - $49,300
  • MU-X 4x4 LS-T auto - $53,500

Filed under: Featured, review, wagon, diesel, rwd, awd, suv, 4wd, Isuzu, isuzu d-max, automatic, Manual, family, large, Advice, special-featured, 4cyl, 5door, 5m, 5a, 7seat, available, upper large, 50-55k, 40-45k, 45-50k, 2014my, isuzu mu-x, 2013my launch

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  • Chris says,
    10 months ago
    1 like
    Would be nice to have some idea of useful things like luggage area, and where the spare tyre is mounted.
    I would love to know if the cargo area is as good as the old Nissan Pathfinder or Misubishi.
    • Tim O'Brien says,
      10 months ago
      3 likes
      Yo Chris, spare tyre (full size naturally) is underneath the rear, below the boot floor.

      Luggage area is high and wide - would easily swallow a mountain bike - and versatile depending upon how you have the seats configured.(I don't have the full measurements though so I'm not sure how it compares to the old Pathfinder and Challenger.)

      With third row folded flat, and second row folded forward, it offers a load length of nearly 2.0 metres, 1995mm.

      It also offers a 3.0 tonne maximum towing capacity (braked trailer), GCM of 5.75 tonne (4X4 models) and tow ball load of 300kg.

      I'll see if if we can dig out those other measurements for comparison.

      Tim
      • mike palmer says,
        9 months ago
        1 like
        Hi Tim,
        Do you know the overall length yet please?
        I have to pull my caravan into a small lane at the back of my property and do a sharp turn at the last second in order to clear the gate post, and have trouble with the bigger 4wd's.
        Regards, Mike
  • Justin says,
    10 months ago
    2 likes
    How does it compare to the 2014 Holden Colorado 7 which already sports the upgraded Duramax Diesel engine? I'm a bit confused if the Holden Colorado 7 you are talking about in the 1st phrase of this review is already the MY 2014 or the MY 2013 which sports the preupgrade Duramax Diesel engine. Please clarify. Thank you
    • Tim O'Brien says,
      10 months ago
      2 likes
      Yup I hear you Justin. The updated Colorado 7 is better than it looks - and its styling is a bit of a blocker for some I'd reckon.

      But, on the basis of this drive, I'd put the MU-X ahead of the Holden for a lot of reasons.

      While the Colorado 7 has a lot more grunt, 500Nm in the auto is a lot of twist, it's only available in an incredibly narrow torque band: 2000-2200rpm.

      That doesn't make it as useful - especially, say, for towing - as the big fat torque band of the MU-X which produces its peak torque of 380Nm from 1800-2800Nm.

      For power there's not a lot between them, the Isuzu's 130kW against the Colorado 7's 147kW (up from 130kW).

      The Isuzu's transmissions also have commercial origins, not so the Holden's. For heavy work, if there's lots of it, that may show in time.

      The Isuzu is also more refined; the Duramax 2 is a tad noisy when working though there's no doubt it can hustle things along.

      Wait till December and drive them both I'd reckon. They're both be sitting at a hefty price advantage over most other heavy duty, turbo diesel, seven-seat SUVs.

      Tim
  • FrugalOne says,
    10 months ago
    4 likes
    SERIOUS 4x4, but $10k over the odds
    • CP says,
      10 months ago
      3 likes
      Very serious 4x4 judging on the articulation in those pics.
    • racrepus says,
      10 months ago
      5 likes
      Why? What other proper 7 seat 4x4 can you get that's this capable for less? If you're going to make bold claims, give some reasoning!
      • Callous says,
        10 months ago
        2 likes
        He never backs anything up. He's just a mouth . rolleyes
      • CAZZO says,
        10 months ago
        5 likes
        Why? What other proper 7 seat 4x4 can you get that's this capable for less? If you're going to make bold claims, give some reasoning!


        Holden Captiva
        Holden Colorado
        Ford Terri

        ALL are better on the road, where these will spend 99.94% of its life

        Fuel tank WAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY to small
        Short service intervals
        $10k too expensive
        smile

        • pro346 says,
          10 months ago
          3 likes
          and none of them are real offroaderslaugh
        • Balthazaaaaaargh says,
          10 months ago
          9 likes
          Cazzo, I'm not sure if you're an idiot, but we're all talking about the MU-X as an offroader. Since the car's you've highlighted aren't 4x4s, it's a bit of a stupid point to make.
        • CAZZO says,
          10 months ago
          4 likes
          Why? What other proper 7 seat 4x4 can you get that's this capable for less? If you're going to make bold claims, give some reasoning!


          Holden Captiva
          Holden Colorado
          Ford Terri

          ALL are better on the road, where these will spend 99.94% of its life

          Fuel tank WAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY to small
          Short service intervals
          $10k too expensive
          smile


          And the Ford Ranger based job, WILL be the closest match

        • racrepus says,
          10 months ago
          1 like
          So the Captiva and Territory are proper 4x4's now? Plus the Colorado is like 90% identical to this, only a lot uglier.

          Really showing your lack of knowledge and inability to back any of your ridiculous claims up with facts. You're a joke.
          • matt says,
            9 months ago
            1 like
            dont feed the troll.
  • kuching says,
    10 months ago
    This new MU-X is much better than the MU-7 (still available in the Philippines and India).laugh

    Hate the interior though.dry
  • Neil Ottaway says,
    10 months ago
    6 likes
    Good article and appears to be a good vehicle. One thing that irks me is that all road testers use the term "degrees" when they refer to slopes. I have extensive survey experience and whilst this article refers to the vehicle idling over a 40 degree slope and traversing a 47 degree slope I would suggest they really mean a 40 percent and 47 percent slope.
    45 degrees is a 100 percent slope, ie 1:1. You cant walk on a 45 degree slope unless it has steps ... most times it is a difficult crawl. I would suggest next time you are testing a vehicle on a steep slope take a surveyor along and ask him to set 45 degree inclination on his theodolite. On a lot of theodolites you can't even view through the eyepiece at 45 degrees unless you turn your head sideways or have an extended eyepiece.
    Remember 90 degrees is vertically straight up, do the math and look at half that and then decide if you could drive a vehicle up that.
    Neil Ottaway
    • Pete says,
      10 months ago
      2 likes
      Stick to surveying Neil - your post is pointless.
    • sally says,
      6 months ago
      you are talking about surveying.. not vehiclesbiggrin
  • ozledge says,
    9 months ago
    3 questions for those in the know please...
    1 how many cup holders?
    2 how many charging points usb & 12 v
    Is there room for a second battery under the hood?

    Thanks
    • Matt says,
      7 months ago
      Cup holders available in centre console, drivers side near door, mid row, and back row seats. I counted 2 12v outlets, one front dash, one rear tailgate, cargo area also has anchor points.
      Drove one from Werribee kia to Melton through back roads. For work I drive a navara,was looking at a wrangler , but questionable for reliability and a higher price tag. Tried prado seems smaller and way over priced. On the fwy it chugs along happily cruising at 110km, off road in 4wd hi, was amazed when going over heavy corrugations and large pot holes, felt nothing no vibration or anything and the traction was awesome. Enjoyed it so much, got one on order due April. Found the sales staff friendly and helpful unlike the Jeep outlets. First mod will be a decent set of muddies, and then look at lift options further down.
      • Cameron - Moorooka Isuzu Ute says,
        1 month ago
        As an Isuzu Ute salesperson - 2 cupholders in middle console, one slide out cupholders on both sides of the dash edges and 2 in the middle fold out arm rest in the 2nd row. There are 3 12V outlets, one in bottom front dash, one in top glovebox and one in rear boot area. In regards to the 2nd battery under the bonnet, you can fit it in there but there is a few things that need to be relocated to do it.
  • The Truth Fairy says,
    9 months ago
    Hmm this or find another $20,000 and buy a 30 year old design 76 series Toyota?
    Are the 3rd row seats easily removable or an unbolt jobbie??
  • Russell Anderson says,
    8 months ago
    I am very happy that Isuzu have produced this vehicle... the base model 4X4 looks like it will suit me down to the ground. I have a V6 petrol 1992 Holden badged Isuzu Jackaroo (bought new) which is still very reliable and solid and drives well but a tad thirsty... maybe time to upgrade!

    Just curious to know if the third row of seats can be a delete option?
  • Murray says,
    8 months ago
    Nice real 4x 4 offering. Please can someone tell me why there is one obvious omission in this category, we have Mitsu Challenger, the Colorado7, Izuzu MU-X and soon to be released in Aus Ford Everest, all based on their respective UTEs. WHERE IS THE TOYOTA FORTUNER?
    • Will says,
      2 months ago
      All on their roofs, they have terrible cornering and gravel road abilities!smile
  • Timmy says,
    8 months ago
    Would love to know how big the boot space is with the third row up and with it down?
    Also, does the third row fold down flat?
  • Jazz says,
    8 months ago
    Hi currently looking to upgrade, we go off road alot and expecting child number 5. Very impressed with this car, due to living in the country unable to view first hand yet. Only question I have is can you fit two child car seats in the second row next to each other allowing the spare seat to move to enable access to the 3rd row?
    • Dave says,
      7 months ago
      Hi Jazz,

      In answer to your question, all seats in the the second row of the MU-X have anchor points for child restraints. This allows you to fit two child seats and still have access to the third row seating. Hope this helps, Dave.
  • John says,
    7 months ago
    Are good vehicles bad for business? I have a Rodeo/Isuzu purchased new in 98 its a 4 X 2 manual V6 and has proven to be the best vehicle we have ever owned. The basis of my question is that it is hard to get rid of a vehicle that goes like new and has been trouble free for 200K Kms.
    A troublesome vehicle is a good incentive to upgrade, in our case we are looking to up grade the safety aspects now lacking in our current vehicle.
    In view of what we have experienced with Isuzu they have proven to be our only choice and we are naturally looking at the MU-X. One thing we have discovered is that a 4 X 2 Auto is more expensive than a 4 X 4 manual by $3000! A 4 X 4 auto is about the same price due to Isuzu's current incentive pricing structure. I don't need a 4 X 4 but its better resale value makes it irresistible not withstanding increase weight and maintenance cost.
  • Luke says,
    7 months ago
    I just test droved it at the dealer in bangkok,thailand..wow! comfortable ride and the looks just stunning.. smile
    I think for 50grand range, its worth it..
    Chevy?..please..its chevy.. -_-
  • Albert Lim says,
    7 months ago
    When will the Isuzu MU-X arrive here in the Philippines? Bcoz the Trailblazer is here with a problem the Chev people cannot address. The Squeeking sound up front. This Isuzu will be a better alternative if it makes it here. Pls. Response as soon as possible. Because I was about to buy a TB. But I will be willing to wait for the MU-X. Thankssmile
  • Edward says,
    6 months ago
    Is there any guidance on MU-X servicing costs? Does Isuzu offer fixed price servicing and if so, how many services or up to what odometer reading? What is the distance interval on services?
    I currently have a diesel Prado and a diesel Hilux, and Toyota has very reasonable service schedules & costs (less than $300 for most) - they are just $15K+ dearer to purchase.
    Also, what sort of price is it for major events like timing belts, brakes or turbos?
    Also, is there any flexibility with fit of top spec items like reversing cameras to lower level models?
  • Edward says,
    6 months ago
    Is there any guidance on MU-X servicing costs? Does Isuzu offer fixed price servicing and if so, how many services or up to what odometer reading? What is the distance interval on services?
    I currently have a diesel Prado and a diesel Hilux, and Toyota has very reasonable service schedules & costs (less than $300 for most) - they are just $15K+ dearer to purchase.
    Also, what sort of price is it for major events like timing belts, brakes or turbos?
    Also, is there any flexibility with fit of top spec items like reversing cameras to lower level models?
    • matt says,
      4 months ago
      not sure on brakes or turbo's, but this thing has a titanium timing chain, it will probably last longer than the car itself.
  • Bryan says,
    6 months ago
    A lot of people make negative comments about the looks of the Colorado 7 but appearances are a subjective thing, I don't mind the Holden at all - there are certainly less attractive wagons on the road e.g. anything from SSangyong! I have seen a few Colorado 7's driving around here but I'm yet to see an Isuzu apart from the one on the dealer's lot.

    Anyway, on to the real reason for my post: when I test drove the Colorado 7 I was a little put off by the amount of engine noise in the cabin, is the Isuzu noticeably quieter inside? If it is, I may have just found my next car!

    It is a shame that neither Holden or Isuzu left the overall length of the wagons the same as that of their respective utes; they are both about twenty centimetres shorter which means that there is virtually no luggage space when the third row of seats are up. About 8 inches in the Colorado from memory which isn't even enough for a suitcase or a shopping bag.

    The extra 20 centimeres would have made all the difference to the cargo area, transforming it from a token gesture to a useful space. If the second row of seats were then mounted on sliding tracks instead of fixed hinges like Toyota's Kluger/Highlander for example you could adjust them to provide a bit more leg room for the third row passenger or even more luggage space if the third row wasn't in use.

    Maybe Isuzu/Holden will consider offering a long wheel base version of their wagons for those of us who would appreciate the extra space; maybe I will email them and suggest it...
  • Sue Boyle says,
    4 months ago
    Can anyone tell me how this will go towing a caravan long distances? I am trading in a petrol 2009 Territory as it is WAY too thirsty. Have been told that being only 4 cyl will mean it has to work far too hard.. Thanks
    • matt says,
      4 months ago
      it will tow a caravan fine, it has roughly the same amount of torque as you're territory, and when towing will use less fuel than it too. if you buy one of these for towing i do not think you will have any issue.
  • wayne says,
    4 months ago
    Will the 4×2pull a 1500kg popup van as good as a 4×4 and are they the same height of the road and as strong in suspension for normal on road camping.
    wayne thanks.
  • Bruce says,
    4 months ago
    1 like
    Had to wait 3 months for mine but was worth it. Very happy.consistent fuel eco round 7 l/100 on trips,9 l/100
    around town. Very comfortable. Mostly used on dirt roads of western nsw suspension gives excellent ride. Better on dirt than black top.IMO great value for money
  • SK says,
    4 months ago
    Can anyone tell me if this has air conditioning vents in the third row? With our summer temps topping well over 45C for weeks in a row, it's an absolute deal-breaker if it doesn't have vents for the poor kids relegated to the rear.
    • Matt says,
      4 months ago
      Affirmative, vents are in 2nd and 3rd rows for AC,
  • George says,
    4 months ago
    1 like
    When is the release in the Philippines. Just waiting to buy.
  • Maurice paull says,
    3 months ago
    5 likes
    I purchased an Isuzu MU-X auto diesel LSU model three months ago. It has now done 11,000 kms. We have just come back from an outback camping trip to the Queensland gulf and the channel country. Both wife and I slept in the back of the Isuzu. No vehicle problems, and with 230 mm clearance, no problems with the rough stuff. Fuel consumption wise, we average 7.3 lt/100kms country /city cycle - not going over 100km/hr. Consumption has been down to 6.3 lt/100kms on outback roads. We are very happy with the Isuzu. It is a very serious off road 4wd. Why pay tens of thousands of dollars more for the popular, but dearer 4 wds, just to hide behind 'status' vehicles, or to be one of the 'Jones'. My star rating is 4.5/5.
    • Greg H says,
      3 months ago
      1 like
      I'm not in the market for this sort of vehicle, but if I was, this is the sort of writeup I'd be looking for - glad it's worked out so well.
  • Amanda says,
    2 months ago
    I got a mu-x LSM and love it only downer is the service price. With the Isuzu becoming more popular the service should have a capped price like all the other major brands have
  • julie says,
    2 months ago
    1 like
    how much does the 2014 isuzu MU-X 4x2 LS-M automatic how far does the tank get you
    • billy bob says,
      2 months ago
      2 likes
      Wouldnt be trying to win one by any chance would youbiggrin
  • Simon Twitchen says,
    2 months ago
    Hi, please can you tell me if the MUX is as big inside as the ford territory please?

    Thanks
    Simom
    • Tim O'Brien says,
      2 months ago
      Yo Simon, it's worth having a look yourself, but yes, without the actual dimensions in front of me, I'd reckon it is.

      The MU-X might be slightly smaller in the boot with the third row in place, but there's little in it.

      Incidentally, the third row in the MU-X is pretty useable - it has a hollow for the feet which gives a bit of extra legroom there.

      It's also a genuine heavy-duty off-roader (unlike the soft-roading territory) and is more a match for the Prado in what it can climb through, up and over.

      Tim
  • Peter Bonfil says,
    1 month ago
    How far will it go on a tank of gas.smile
    • roman says,
      1 month ago
      1 like
      1500ks/tank
      • Kelly anderson says,
        3 days ago
        Is that right, because my ute doesn't use that much fuel???
  • harrysimbolon says,
    21 days ago
    1 like
    I just test droved it at the dealer in bangkok,thailand..wow! comfortable ride and the looks just stunning.. smile
    I think for 50grand range, its worth it..
    Chevy?..please..its chevy.. -_-
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