2013 Hyundai Santa Fe Elite CRDi Off-road Review

Overall Rating

  • Interior

  • On And Off The Road

  • Ancap

  • Value For Money

  • See Full Specs

What’s Hot

Brilliant power and torque, amazing traction for a 'light duty' AWD.

What’s Not

Ground clearance is tight and 'Flex Steer' annoying.

X Factor

An SUV that you can actually use off-road. Its ability will astound you.

  • Country of Origin
    KOREA
  • Price
    $45,990 (plus on-road costs)
  • Engine
    4 Cylinders
  • Output
    145 kW / 436 Nm
  • Transmission
    Sports Automatic
  • ANCAP Rating
    5
  • Airbags
    Driver & Passenger (Dual), Knee Driver, Head for 2nd Row Seats, Side for 1st Row Occupants (Front), Head for 3rd Row Seats, Head for 1st Row Seats (Front)
  • L/100 km
    7.3
  • C02
    192 g/km
  • Luggage Capacity
    632 L
  • Towing (braked)
    2000 kg
  • Towing (unbraked)
    750 kg
Karl Peskett | Feb 5, 2013 | 50 Comments

2013 HYUNDAI SANTA FE REVIEW

Vehicle Style: Seven-seat SUV
Price: $45,990 (plus on-roads)
Fuel Economy claimed: 7.3L/100km | tested: 12.5L/100km

Santa Fe, in Spanish, means “holy faith”.

Faith in Hyundai’s ability to build a decent SUV was in our minds when we decided to saddle up the Santa Fe for a soft beach-sand excursion.

But the Santa Fe isn’t really marketed to beachgoers. Sure, it’s for active types - those with a big family who want to go places - but isn't it really just a wagon with a bit of AWD versatility? After all, it’s a seven-seat SUV with all-wheel-drive, a raised ride height and plenty of space.

But here at TMR, we like to push things. And if Hyundai is going to build an all-wheel-drive wagon, we want to find out how well "all wheels drive it".

INTERIOR

Quality: The Santa Fe is without a doubt the best-built Hyundai of the moment.

There’s nothing in the way of squeaks or rattles and the interior materials really appeal. Throughout, there's a good blend of textures and finishes across the car (although we found a mismatch in the leather in the front seats).

Comfort: Plenty of space means passengers in the first two rows will be happy on a long trips out to the local fishing spot. The third row is quite claustrophobic, but as a five-seater and occasional seven, the Santa Fe works well.

The leather seats are comfortable; electric adjustment for the driver, and equally comfortable for the passenger (who does without the electrics, but doesn’t seem to suffer) with excellent lower back support.

Equipment: On test was the Elite model. It's stocked with all the mod-cons you’d want.

Beautiful, clear satnav, dual-zone climate control, second-row vents with third row air-con, self-dimming rear view mirror, reversing camera and parking sensors, electric park brake with auto hold, phone and media Bluetooth, rain-sensing wipers, auto headlights, cruise control and rear passenger privacy blinds – phew. It really is a well-kitted vehicle.

Storage: There’s plenty of storage in here. Apart from the glovebox, there’s a space under the dash, huge door pockets shaped for a water bottle, under-armrest storage and heaps of cupholders.

The boot is a helpful 516 litres with the third row folded with 1615 litres available when the second row is flipped forward.

ON AND OFF THE ROAD

With ground clearance at 185mm, and no low range, rock-climbing was out of the question. Most owners, afterall, would rarely venture past a dirt trail.

But sand, that's loosely at the edge of the Santa Fe's remit. So, how does it go when faced with loose beach sand?

That's what we wanted to find out. It would be a challenge of the all-wheel-drive system. As a front-driver (essentially), with power sent rearward when required, the Santa Fe would need to be quick in ascertaining slip before the front wheels tried to dig their way to the earth’s core.

The AWD system of the last-gen Santa Fe was mediocre in this environment, and, even with the AWD lock engaged, it would overheat and revert back to FWD.

Heading to our "beach test", on the highway out of town the Santa Fe shone. Excellent handling for its size and shape, and a firm but comfortable ride.

Then, after turning off the highway onto a corrugated track to the coast, it was time to “air down”.

Tyre pressures for the test were set at 15psi. Any lower and a tyre could roll off the rim. Any higher and there was a risk of getting stuck.

After an hour of negotiating rocks, bushes and tracks, we hit the dunes.

Driveability: There are two heroes in this car. One is the engine. The other is the all-wheel-drive system.

The 2.2-litre turbodiesel belies its size with reall robust outputs. With 145kW and 421Nm on tap, it’s super-flexible and doesn’t bog down when faced with the continuous resistance of sand.

Instead, it clicks unfussed from gear-to-gear through the six-speed auto.

In normal conditions, power is fed to the front wheels. But, when extra grip is needed, it then gets fed to the rear to share the load.

If faced with tough going, you can lock it in AWD.

This is what we did to ensure the rear wheels played their part in the sand. (And despite hammering the Santa Fe for hours on end, not once did the system overheat or cut out.)

Hyundai’s Flex Steer system, however, is next to useless - there are three modes available but only one that works. In Comfort or Normal mode, it’s too slack and doesn’t feel connected to the wheels at all.

In Sport mode there’s enough weight to satisfy, but this really should be the default setting for all situations.

To drive in these conditions, traction control and stability control have to be turned off (a two-step process) - you don't want the wheels to clamp during wheelspin.

If you forget, any forward progress you make will be reduced to naught as the wheel brakes and buries you.

We found that the best way to drive the Santa Fe in these conditions was to ease onto the throttle off the line and then build up speed and keep it up, especially in the really boggy sections.

Its performance was a real surprise. When climbing the steeper sections, it became just a matter of taking a decent run-up, keeping the foot buried and letting the momentum carry us over the crest (without getting stranded on the sills).

For a light duty off-roader, the Santa Fe tackled the rough stuff a lot better than we expected. And, rewarding our faith, not once did it bury us.

Refinement: A strength of the Santa Fe is its refinement. So quiet is it that one of our off-roading companions asked, “Is this the diesel?” Yes, it was running at the time.

Sure, you can hear the revs as you’re gunning it, but it’s never boomy or grating.

Suspension: Using MacPherson strut fronts and multi-link rear, the Santa Fe is conventional - but with on-road handling that is better than most.

Off the road it’s perhaps firmer than necessary. It will find the bump stops quicker than a 'proper four-wheel-drive' when traversing ruts.

Braking: The hill-descent control works very well, though in the dunes a human foot is just as capable. Pedal feel is very good and braking is supplied by vented fronts and solid rear discs.

SAFETY

ANCAP rating: 5 Stars

Safety features: Seven airbags - driver & front passenger, front side airbags, side curtain airbags, and driver’s knee; ABS with brake force distribution and brake assist, stability management with stability control and traction control.

WARRANTY AND SERVICING

Warranty: 5 years/unlimited km.

Service costs: Hyundai’s capped price servicing limits the costs of each routine service. The first three services at 15,000km/12 month intervals are priced at $319 each for a total of $957.

HOW IT COMPARES | VALUE FOR MONEY

Kia Sorento SLi diesel ($43,990) – With the same AWD system and engine as the Santa Fe, the Sorento is also a good buy. They’re twins but look different, so it comes down to personal preference (see Sorento reviews)

Ford Territory TX ($43,240) – No match for the Santa Fe’s off-road ability, the Territory is however more comfortable on the road. Its 2.7 litre diesel, though refined, is also pretty slow. (see Territory reviews)

Holden Captiva 7 LX ($43,490) The Captiva is left behind in all departments except space. The interior is cheap, the ride misjudged and the diesel is slower. Off-road it lacks the grunt that can pull the Santa Fe through (see Captiva reviews)

Note: all prices are Manufacturer’s List Price and do not include dealer delivery or on-road costs.

TMR VERDICT | OVERALL

Stuck? Not once. And neither did we have a nervous moment.

It was simple, really. But the confounded looks others gave us as we sailed past in the Santa Fe were proof that it was unexpected.

The final word should go to the guy who walked up to us after we stopped for a short break.

“That was just unbelievable. My brother just bought one of these and I told him not to bring it because he’d get stuck. Next time he can bring it – and he can pull me out."

On the very same section of beach a Patrol was struggling (with off-road tyres), a LandCruiser was only inching forward, a Rodeo had to be snatched out and a Wrangler was completely buried. That alone underlined our belief Hyundai has something a little special in the Santa Fe.

This is one really versatile and capable car. We wouldn't suggest you'd do what we did to it every day... but you can do it.

Pricing

2.4 litre Petrol

  • Active - six-speed manual - $36,990
  • Active - six-speed automatic - $38,990

2.2 litre R-Series Diesel

  • Active - six-speed manual - $39,990
  • Active - six-speed automatic - $41,990
  • Elite - six-speed automatic - $45,990
  • Highlander - six-speed automatic - $49,990

Note: prices exclude on-road costs.

Filed under: Featured, Hyundai, review, wagon, diesel, hyundai santa fe, santa fe, awd, suv, automatic, family, large, Advice, special-featured, 4cyl, 5door, 6a, 7seat, available, 45-50k, 2013my

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  • SON OF CAZZO says,
    1 year ago
    4 likes
    Wow, impressive! And it does not use a DPF... even better!
    • FrugalOne says,
      4 months ago
      4 likes
      Wow, impressive! And it does not use a DPF... even better!


      $50k [Benz coin] for a Korean...ON DRUGS!!smile

  • BH says,
    1 year ago
    3 likes
    yeah what he said... unbelievable scores! Looks fantastic too. come on pregnancy scans (twins twins twins)
  • Ben Harding says,
    1 year ago
    3 likes
    Motor is too small for towing,sad unable to pull 17" caravan (2000kg) sad
    • John Doe says,
      1 year ago
      5 likes
      17 inch caravan? laugh
    • Callous says,
      1 year ago
      2 likes
      The previous model towed 17 foot caravans around Australia with one couple saying their's went around 3 times without fault. There are caravanning forums full of people who use them without any drama if you care to check. The main issue is tow ball download limit with the new one.

      The old model is rated at 150kg and the new one 100kg (same as Sorrento) which isn't enough. Kia are offering a heavy duty towpack on the Sorrento after criticism so I expect Hyundai will follow suit soon enough. The Sorrento one ups to 130kg.
      • Balthazaaaargh says,
        1 year ago
        1 like
        Sorento is listed at 120kg actually, but as TMR reported last week, there's also a 150kg package that has recently been made available for like 900 bucks or something
    • matthew tiss says,
      10 months ago
      1 like
      147kw and 421nm is far more than needed to pull a caravan
    • k west says,
      1 month ago
      3 likes
      considering selling my piece of crap. current model 2012 sante fe. overheating once outside temp reaches 30 deg celcius unable to tow 16ft caravan grrrr paid nearly $50,000 unable to do what i was asured it could do by sales staff. only has 23,000ks on the clock. not happy whatsoever.hyundai told me its my problem. PLEASE DO NOT BUY NOT WORTH THE HASSLE. RADIATOR TO SMALL
      • Callous says,
        11 days ago
        Liar. I've spoken to heaps of people who've said they towed vans around Australia with no problems. Maybe you are just one of those that can't look after your car.
  • Callous says,
    1 year ago
    4 likes
    I picked mine up last week and am blown away to be honest. I've had a couple of other top spec SUVs and both were pretty good but this vehicle is simple awesome. I chose the mid spec elite in ocean blue.

    Most of the reviews I read agreed with my belief that the midspec model had "everything you need and nothing you don't". The features list in the mid spec includes folding mirrors and leds in the door handles that lightup as you approach the car illuminating the ground along both sides of the vehicle. A classy touch. smile

    On this current tank of diesel including around half of it being on the highway I am currently sitting on 9.0lts -100k,s on an engine with less than 900 kilometres on the clock. We took it for a good run on the weekend and it is simply a fantastic car. Pretty damned good for a heavy SUV with so much power when needed and it will improve as the engine loosens up.

    Overtaking is totally effortless. Whilst the flex steer is very subtle I don't agree it is entirely useless. I found the sport setting great around town where directional feel is more important but use comfort on the highway where less adjustment on centre is required at higher speeds. Mostly a gim*** but not entirely.

    I actually enjoy the steering but then I have had 4years to get used to it (electronic) in other cars. One day they will all have it.

    I considered the Sorento but don't like the current styling of it ,particularly at the rear .The vertical front foglights look awkward too and I wonder why they didn't do them similar to the sportage? The santéfe looks fantastic and already I have had several comments. They have a winner!

    My only issue is a Bluetooth fault that Hyundai are working on a software update for. The phone doesn't transfer all the numbers onto the touch screen. A minor quibble however.
  • Mike Stevens
    Mike Stevens [TMR] says,
    1 year ago
    1 like
    Hi all,

    Like the Sorento, the Santa Fe also has an uprated towing kit available. See details below, direct from Hyundai Australia (verbatim).

    ----
    Santa Fe has the option of a ‘Load Assist Kit’ (consists of two rear heavy duty springs) fitted which increases the maximum static ball load from 120kg to 150kg (maximum braked towing capacity remains the same: 2000kg for automatic and 2500kg for manual vehicles).

    - Towbar, Towball & Trailer Wiring Harness: $772.50
    - Load Assist Kit (Springs): $187.00

    **Prices: inc gst ex fitment**
    -----


    • Trickster says,
      1 year ago
      Interesting. The Hyundai website states the towball limit is 100kg and there is nothing on their website to state the towball has been changed to 150kg - not even the Latest News section.
      • Mike Stevens
        Mike Stevens [TMR] says,
        1 year ago
        1 like
        Indeed. We've confirmed the details with Hyundai Australia however, so a word with your dealer should get you hooked up (literally...)

        Cheers,

        Mike.
  • Why So Long? says,
    1 year ago
    It's a relief to read such good reviews on the Hyundai Santa Fe. We ordered ours early December, 2012 from a large Hyundai dealer in Sydney, and we were informed yesterday we won't be receiving it until Mid March/early April. The delivery times are a real let down when it comes to buying a new carsad. We are hoping the wait is worth it!
  • Nobody says,
    1 year ago
    2 likes
    Agree with Callous...test driven the Active diesel and was blown away by the refinement and quality. Ordered a Highlander in Black with an ETA of April end. Can't wait enough.
  • Jason says,
    1 year ago
    1 like
    "On the very same section of beach a Patrol was struggling (with off-road tyres), a LandCruiser was only inching forward, a Rodeo had to be snatched out and a Wrangler was completely buried."

    In my opinion your review is irresponsible by encouraging anyone who purchases these all wheel drive vehicles to drive off road without mentioning that they should receive proper training through 4WD course. I also find it unbelievable that the proper low range 4WD's you mention had a more difficult time. I have just got back from Fraser Island where I came across a Hyundai Santa Fe that was bogged in deep sand. The owner said they were running 16PSI in their tyres and that they had been bogged for the third time that day with three children in the car on a very hot day. In addition they had none of their own recovery gear with them as would have been taught in 4WD course.
    • Balthazaaaargh says,
      1 year ago
      4 likes
      Urgh. How do "UNlike" a comment? You guys should install some thumbs-up/thumbs-down buttons!
    • Balthazaaaaaargh says,
      1 year ago
      2 likes
      This reminds me of a comment I saw online recently.

      "I'm not saying let's kill off all the stupid people, I'm just saying we should remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out."

  • craig says,
    1 year ago
    2 likes
    This is a very useful review. It would be great to see more "Off-Road" reviews of these soft-road type SUVs.
  • amlohac says,
    1 year ago
    Shocked! Who'd of thought it could do that.

    "On the very same section of beach a Patrol was struggling (with off-road tyres), a LandCruiser was only inching forward, a Rodeo had to be snatched out and a Wrangler was completely buried."

    This seems weird, possibly not a fault of any of those vehicles as they are all faily amazing off road (wrangler and landCruiser)I would lay the blame on the drivers of those vehicles having no idea how to drive in the dunes.
    • styler says,
      1 year ago
      Shocked - not
      Most soft roaders with a locking diff can go along way off road if driven carefully.
      Most seem to forget that many soft roaders have the advantage of being light weight (compared to the proper 4wds) with fairly wide rubber that combined, reduces the footprint pressure.
      A driver that knows how to drive off road and the capability of their car also helps.
      Pity about the ground clearance - this is probably its biggest weakness for off road work.
  • Newhyandaifan says,
    1 year ago
    1 like
    Hey Guys,
    Just ordered the Santa Fe Hylander with mats, tow bar, nudge bar, side steps, roof rack and front sensors for $55k drive away...Any thoughts?
    • Suzy says,
      1 year ago
      We got out Santa Fe Elite in November and we are very happy with it. biggrin In December we did a trip from Sydney to Brisbane on one tank of diesel! We got 7.2L per 100km on the trip up and back. Recommend that it is worth waiting for!
      • Uncle Ado says,
        1 year ago
        Hi Suzy
        looks like i have to wait till June 15th to get my Highlander thanks for the info Uncle Adosad
  • barra240t says,
    1 year ago
    Hey,

    You said the Territory is no match off road, I had a quick look at your Territory reviews but it seems you haven't done an actual off road test only on road, so how can you say it is no match??
    • Mike Stevens
      Mike Stevens [TMR] says,
      1 year ago
      Hi Barra,

      We're often afforded the opportunity to take various models for a spin - sometimes long enough to get an accurate idea of their capabilities, but not long enough to justify a published review. We've had the Territory off the tarmac long enough to make a call on it against the Santa Fe.

      Will we lock in another tester and publish a Territory off-road review? Possibly. You'll just have to wait and see...

      Cheers,

      Mike.
      • barra240t says,
        1 year ago
        Cool Mike,

        Only asking because I've seen a few Territories off road up the beach and they don't seem to have an issue (not that I would risk doing such a thing) Would love to see an off road review smile Thanks for the reply.
        • Danny says,
          1 year ago
          Hi Mike,

          Firstly ok review, however I too would like to see a similar review with the latest SZ AWD Territory.

          Unlike the previous generation Territory that has a fixed 38/62 front/rear AWD system, the new SZ Territory AWD is an Active (ECU based) Borg Warner system. Understanding it doesn't have a 50/50 lock it would still be quite capable.

          There was no mention of the new SZ Territory AWD system in any of your Ford Territory reviews, yet the new Hyundai AWD system was covered in depth in the Santa Fe review.

          Have you had the new SZ Territory off the Tarmac to make a proper call?

          Also there is no mention in the Santa Fe review about he ground clearance being lower than the previous generation (now 185mm, previously 200mm). This is approaching the Ford Territory clearance which is only 1cm lower at (175cm).

          Would be great to see your assumption substantiated with a review that Territory is no match.
  • David Hosie says,
    1 year ago
    2 likes
    I bought the Active, it is even better on the beach because of the 17s and higher profile tyres. This car has averaged 8.7 L per hundred around Perth.
    It's not perfect, the Active has no dash light dimmer, 1st car I've ever owned that didn't have one.
    The engine torque and performance is awesome.
    Hyundai have done a brilliant job, it is a shame the car didn't come with the upgraded rear springs from the start for Australia, Aussies use SUVs for towing all the time.
    • jack001 says,
      1 year ago
      for some one who can live without the extra luxury of elite, highlander interior spec. i think active diesel is a very good buy, consider the mechanical for all three model are identical. and it is around $5k+ cheaper to buy. but if i have $$$$ i would like to get elite or highlander too!!!rolleyes
  • Simon says,
    1 year ago
    1 like
    We have had our Elite since December. Our average fuel usage is 7.1 mixed highway and town. Just reset the trip and did a hilly highway run of 150km through 3 towns and averaged 5.8l/100km. I don't think any AWD this size would match that with the amount of grunt this car has. It is a very quick car with loads of torque and a very good auto. The steering is terrible compared to the last one which we also owned. That is my main complaint. Everything else is great and no DPF and high crash rating makes this the best medium awd bar none.
  • Simon says,
    11 months ago
    Mike, looking at buying elite after recent rd test, but have doubts about braking system. Will the elite hav similar issues Hyundai has been experiencing with the ix35, as there's lots of bad comments from owners and seems Hyundai not coving this under warranty sad or smile
  • darrell says,
    11 months ago
    I looked very briefly at this vehicle when I went to trade my 100 series Cruiser in. While I liked the look of it, the lack of decent towing spec's took it off of my list. So it was a BT 50 dual cab for me. However I agree about the looks, features of it a very good effort. I also agree about the flex steer as I had electric power steer on the I30 diesel that I traded in at the same time on a Honda.
  • Beaste says,
    10 months ago
    I have had a highlander as my company drive for the last 6 months and 15000 km.

    Due for its service but the only thing to discuss as a warranty issue is the loss of a cover the headlight washers!

    It follows 2 Toyota klugers. The Hyundai is better in every way except for space. 75 mm shorter in the wheel base shows in the middle row leg room. Otherwise the hyundai is a far better drive, as well finished and granda features at kxs price.

    It's a car I could be happy to call my own and the last time I thought that was when I had a last gen Subaru outback premium.....

    Please mr Hyundai can we have the longer wheelbase model they sell in the states?
  • Pommy Battler says,
    8 months ago
    One of the downsides with this vehicle seems to be the length of time it takes to get hold of one. I ordered mine 2 months ago and the dealer still has no idea when it will arrive. They say Hyundai haven't even started building it let alone shipping it to Australia. Hyundai customer service don't even both returning your emails. Not having a car at all is definitely not helping my customer satisfaction especially when I was promised the car in August.
    • DP says,
      8 months ago
      I'm surprised the dealer promised you it was arriving in August. Every dealer I went to (Sydney) told me 3-4 months. When I finally did a deal on a Highlander with one of the dealers they said they said up to 6 months. The date on my contract is 27 Dec 2013. I Ordered in June. A looooong wait. sad
      • jack001 says,
        7 months ago
        i order mine in end of jan, deliver in end of june. it also depend on what colour and what spec you order...
    • Sean Udal says,
      5 months ago
      I ordered an Active diesel manual last week and can not get an ETA from them. bleh
      Such a great car, but so hard to get any.

      I have a VIN number, but nothing more. The car is in Ulsan but I want to get the ship name and an ETA date.
    • Sean Udal says,
      5 months ago
      Trying to get an ETA on the Santa Fe is difficult. They are made in Ulsan, however trying to find out how long it takes to get to Australia is anyone's guess.

      Such a great car that is so hard to buy. sad

      Sean
  • Ben says,
    6 months ago
    1 like
    Buyer beware

    I bought my Highlander two months ago and found the paint finish doesn’t match the price. I want everyone to stop at predelivery and have a look. The dealer in springwood delivered it in the shade and now I know why. If you look in the sun past the glare of the new car you might find some unexpected flaws. The main areas to look are at the top of the doors where the car rolls around to the roof. More peel then a juice factory. One of my doors has a paint crease where there is no crease in metal. The rear bumper has SPEC of undercoat showing. I feel the ECO button is only connected to the light on the dash when test driving engage it and watch revs Nil movement. I believe the engine revs at 2000 when it would do the same job at 1200.Any one over 185cm will find all the way down on the driver’s seat not quite enough.
    Now the Good
    This is truly a luxury car and now to hear it is this good off road it just keeps surprising me.
    dry
    • FrugalOne says,
      4 months ago
      5 likes
      Buyer beware

      I bought my Highlander two months ago and found the paint finish doesn’t match the price. I want everyone to stop at predelivery and have a look. The dealer in springwood delivered it in the shade and now I know why. If you look in the sun past the glare of the new car you might find some unexpected flaws. The main areas to look are at the top of the doors where the car rolls around to the roof. More peel then a juice factory. One of my doors has a paint crease where there is no crease in metal. The rear bumper has SPEC of undercoat showing. I feel the ECO button is only connected to the light on the dash when test driving engage it and watch revs Nil movement. I believe the engine revs at 2000 when it would do the same job at 1200.Any one over 185cm will find all the way down on the driver’s seat not quite enough.
      Now the Good
      This is truly a luxury car and now to hear it is this good off road it just keeps surprising me.


      Like I always said, strip away the fake nonsense and the true picture will come out, fooled most o the people but NOT those in the know, M I L E S behind the Japanese, MILES.....

    • Stew Henstock says,
      4 months ago
      Maybe you should of looked at your car more efficiently when picking it up...not 2 months later.smile
  • k west says,
    4 months ago
    1 like
    i purchased a 2012 santa fe and it sufferd from overheating when towing a 16ft caravan up hill on the hwy. the van only weighed 1350 kgs the problem was solved with no help or advice from hyundai. they acted dumb. forked out aprox $500 and had auto trans oil cooler fitted. now no matter how big the hill is or how hard you flog it the temp gauge dont move from normal. hope this is of some use
    • FrugalOne says,
      4 months ago
      5 likes
      i purchased a 2012 santa fe and it sufferd from overheating when towing a 16ft caravan up hill on the hwy. the van only weighed 1350 kgs the problem was solved with no help or advice from hyundai. they acted dumb. forked out aprox $500 and had auto trans oil cooler fitted. now no matter how big the hill is or how hard you flog it the temp gauge dont move from normal. hope this is of some use


      Like I always said, strip away the fake nonsense and the true picture will come out, fooled most of the people but NOT those in the know, M I L E S behind the Japanese, MILES.....


  • Damo says,
    3 months ago
    Looking at buying a 2014 Santa Fe elite diesel just wondering what type of drive away deals people have negotiated so I've got a starting point. Cheers
    • Champ says,
      3 months ago
      Hey Damo
      I got the latest model Santa Fe Elite December MY2013 diesel in Qld for driveway $47000 including electronic rust protection, carpet mats and luggage tray. Hope this helps.
      Cheers
      Champ
      • Andrew says,
        3 months ago
        Hey champ where did you get that price? I'm after the same myself right now...smile
  • k west says,
    3 months ago
    1 like
    2012 santefe overheating problem with towing 16ft caravan uphill has returned with the rising summer temperatures. oil cooler didnt fix problem as previously stated. but certainly wouldnt hurt to have one fitted anyway. once outside temp reaches 30deg celcius towing is risky as engine can and will shut down in the most dangerous situation.still trying to get hyundai to fix the problem under warranty. (radiator to small to do the job ?)
  • k west says,
    1 month ago
    1 like
    smile its sold got rid of my piece of crap hyundai sante fe bought a new toyota hylux should have no more worries about over heating smile
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