TMR Team | Dec 17, 2012

Flesh-and-blood parking inspectors could soon join the ranks of workers displaced by computerised systems, with new sensor technology to be deployed in Adelaide next year.

The city of Charles Sturt will be among the first in the country to trial the new automated sensors, designed to catch overstayers and maximise space availability.

Developed at The University of Adelaide, the new 'Smart ePark' will replace most parking inspectors employed by the Charles Sturt council in a bid to improve efficiency and turnover.

"In cities across Australia there is a proliferation of cars. Finding vacant parking spaces is becoming more and more difficult as well as creating congestion problems with cars circling the streets," Dr Balakrishnan, Chief Executive Officer and Director of eSMART 21, said.

"Our intelligent automated system is one-of-a-kind, and will increase parking monitoring efficiency and help councils improve the use of parking space."

Current systems rely on inspectors to monitor parking spaces manually, noting usage and issuing infringement notices.

The SMART ePark system uses wireless sensors, cameras and purpose-built software to monitor usage, and automatically issue infringement notices by mail to offenders.

The sensors log times in and out of parking bays and will automatically generate a list of 'overstayers'; to be checked against specially marked video footage for identification of numberplates.

Dr Balakrishnan said that while the system is bound to draw the ire of motorists caught out by the cameras, others will welcome the increased availability of parking spaces.

"There will be no more tickets left on windscreens or dodging inspectors. Overstaying in car parking spaces will be significantly reduced, freeing up more spaces for shoppers," he said.

SMART ePark developers Indrajit Majumder and Dr Jega Balakrishnan.
SMART ePark developers Indrajit Majumder and Dr Jega Balakrishnan.