Peter Anderson | Aug 27, 2012

The RACQ is calling on the Queensland Government to consider a complete overhaul of the state's motorcycle licensing process.

The body says that "piecemeal" changes over the last six years are failing to identify and remedy safety problems in motorcycling safety.

"The former Queensland Parliamentary Travelsafe Committee held an enquiry into Q-RIDE motorcycle licensing in 2006 and there was a motorcycle safety discussion paper in 2008," RACQ Senior Road Safety Advisor Joel Tucker said.

"It is time to revisit some of the recommendations from those enquiries."

Statistics show that an average of sixty motorcycle riders and pillion passengers were killed each year between 2006 and 2010.

Under current legislation, those wishing to obtain a motorcycle licence have two options open to them: Q-RIDE and Q-SAFE.

Each of the options have different rules around how long a learner's permit is held before attempting to secure a provisional licence.

Q-RIDE mandates a six month period, while Q-SAFE does not require a minimum term.

"We’d like to see alignment of the minimum learner licence period for Q-RIDE and Q-SAFE test participants, because this was another recommendation from the Travelsafe Committee," Mr Tucker said.

Off-road pre-learner training - similar to Victoria and NSW - had been previously recommended, but not adopted.

The RACQ will recommend a logbook of learner hours be kept, a similar system used by a number of states for learner drivers.

"While novice motorcycle riders may be familiar with Queensland’s road environment as car drivers, we’re concerned about their inexperience on motorcycles because they offer very little physical protection if there is a crash," Mr Tucker said.

After making a submission to the Transport, Housing and Local Government Committee last month, the RACQ will today be giving evidence and making their recommendations at a public hearing on motorcycle safety.