2013 Toyota Landcruiser 70 Double-cab On Sale In Australia From September

Mike Stevens | Aug 3, 2012

Toyota has introduced a new double-cab version of its 70-Series workhorse, confirming news reported by The Motor Report in March.

Demand for the new variant in the mining sector has also ensured that Australia will be the first market in the world to pick up the double-cab workhorse.

On sale in late September and priced from $63,990, the 4.5 litre V8-powered double-cab will be the fourth body style in the range, joining the single cab-chassis, troop carrier and wagon.

Toyota Australia's Matthew Callachor said that the popularity of modified 70-Series wagons played a part in the carmaker's decision to launch a double-cab.

"The 70-Series is so popular for the really tough jobs that customers have been modifying the wagon version to provide the flexibility of a double-cab ute," Mr Callachor said.

"The double cab will carry five adults as well as providing a one-tonne payload for their heavy gear, such as surveying equipment," he said.

All nine LandCruiser 70 Series models share Toyota's 4.5 litre V8 turbodiesel engine, producing 151kW at 3400rpm and 430Nm of torque between 1200 and 3200rpm.

As a new model in the line-up, the LC79 double-cab also benefits from new upgrades, including anti-skid brakes on all grades, air-inlet snorkel mounted on the A pillar, improved seats, in-dash multi-function clock and audio/CD system with Bluetooth hands-free, audio streaming and voice-recognition phone/audio.

Standard features for the entry-level double-cab Workmate grade include 16-inch steel split rims, aluminium side steps, vinyl seat facings and floor coverings, black bumpers and the extra-cost option of diff locks.

Upgrading to the GXL spec adds 16-inch alloy wheels, over-fender flares, remote central locking, differential locks, fog lamps, power windows, carpet and cloth seats.

We were right: this is our rendering in March.
We were right: this is our rendering in March.

Pricing

Wagon
Workmate $59,990
GXL $64,290

Troop carrier
Workmate $65,790
GXL $67,990

Single cab
Workmate $58,790
GX $60,790
GXL $62,790

Double cab
Workmate $63,990
GXL $67,990

Note: prices exclude on-road costs.

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Filed under: Featured, Toyota, 70 series, landcruiser 70 series, toyota landcruiser 70 series, 2012, 4wd, landcruiser, commercial, Toyota Landcruiser, News, pickup, dual-cab, available, toyota landcruiser 70 series double-cab, lc79, toyota lc79, toyota landcruiser 70 series lc79

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  • Roger says,
    2 years ago
    1 like
    How did they manage to only get 430Nm out of a 4.5 V8 TDI? I assume this is single turbo as opposed to Landcruiser 200 to equate to a massive difference of 650Nm in the 200 Series. This unit is less than any of the new gen 4 and 5 cylinder engines producing nearer to 500Nm. Even Prado has 410Nm.
    • Mark says,
      2 years ago
      3 likes
      have a look at the state of tune. 430Nm pretty much from idle to 3,200 rpm. thats pretty solid for most of the engines usuable rev range. most modern turbo diesel engines have a huge torque figure but only maintain it for 1,000 and its usually from 1,750 rpm or so to 2,500. Modern turbo petrol engines have a fatter torque band, producing their maximium torque from low rpms like 1,200 all the way to 5,000 rpm. BMW a good example of this. I suspect the loweish torque figure for this V8 is due to the state of tune. Its got pretty good kW's, IMO with the power and torque this produces in its lowish state of tune, this engine will last forever and be a solid performer.
      • Roger says,
        2 years ago
        1 like
        I dont doubt the longevity, but Prado is the same on that front, it was more along the lines of at that price I expect better. This is a VERY expensive vehicle, and that engine is definitely capable of more. I would actually suggest that the 3.0 would do just as well, so it surprises me that they didnt put it in...maybe marketing due to clash with HiLux? I followed a 3.0 Prado up a freeway on ramp the other day, I must say its performance belies its lowish output.
        • jesse says,
          2 years ago
          2 likes
          lmao... you really dont understand the purpose of this vehicle. The 3.0 can produce the same figures but is more stressed doing so and therefore wont do it as reliably over longer periods. ALSO the 3.0 will rely on its turbo more and generate more heat which is hard to cool at low speed... its not all about numbers.
        • jesse says,
          2 years ago
          1 like
          Sadly it looks like this will be the last hurrah for a proper 4wd. Everything's going monocoque with high strung small capacity engines... admittedly it would be nice if Toyota had updated the comfort levels a tad more... improved aero and ergonomics... but this thing is a proper truck and when it goes there will be a massive hole in the market. It seems a lot of urbanites really dont understand or see the need for a vehicle like this, which frankly is good because the number of 4wd's doing school runs that never get out of town is terrifying, both for safety and the environment. I know a lot of guys who have been waiting on this ... though it would be great if it was priced a bit more reasonably.
  • MarkB says,
    2 years ago
    1 like
    Take an old 80's prado chassis ans body. Update the front metal a tad a throw in a V8 TDI that seems to make less power than some 4cyl TDI's and charge over 60K for it and this is what you get. What a pile of steaming crap.
    • Nick says,
      2 years ago
      1 like
      MarkB you have obviously never driven one in the sort of conditions they were designed for. I have just done the Canning Stock Route in a 2008 79 series ute it did it so easily it was not funny 2000 kms and 997 sand dunes and did not need to back off for another go on any of them. I even did one section in 2wd by mistake and didn't even realise untill I went to take it out. There is a very old saying that there is no substitute for cubic inches and that was always aimed at the japanese Toyota finally worked it out with a big understressed diesel
      Big Nick
  • BIGBOY says,
    2 years ago
    1 like
    I have one of those 4cyl turbo *** tins and they all scream their heads off when doing any tow work can't wait for the new d/cab.
  • MEGB says,
    2 years ago
    why are trade vehicles never updated as family cars? my grand father had something similar to this, I know they come with better engines but for gods sake they look pretty the same for years
  • Alan says,
    2 years ago
    It would be the idea vehicle if they put their 5 speed Automatic in it. Got to old to be changing gears. Great work Toyota.
    • Carl says,
      2 years ago
      why would anyone consider going off road in a vehicle with auto transmission? Why would you go go camping with a vehicle that cannot be tow-started? Ever been bogged with an auto transmission?
      • Andrew says,
        2 years ago
        1 like
        It is a known fact that properly set up and driven offload vehicles with auto transmission are more capable than manual be it sand, mud or rock BUT the downside is can't push or tow start if batteries or starter die, can run hot if oil coolers not fitted or too small and usually not serviceable in the bush where at least a good mechanic can at least repair a manual. Like most things in life pretty hard to get the perfect mix.
        • Colin says,
          2 years ago
          1 like
          Had a 3 lt 4x4 for 6 years. Changed 12 months ago to a series 79 and have just come back from Cape York. The difference is amazing. Handled rough tracks and corrugations beautifully. The torque at low revs make it easier to drive.
          • Macka says,
            2 years ago
            1 like
            I had a Nissan Patrol 3.0ltr common rail turbo diesel. It used 16 litres per hundred km's. That was on flat highway use over a 3 yr period. Nissan basically said suck it up. Its what you get when try and make large NM's out of a 4cyl.So I decided to trade up to the V8. It absolutely excelled in the Vic high country and uses 11.5 ltrs per hundred on the flat. Now fitted with a 3" exhaust, it sounds like the grunty beast that it is. I tow a 25' caravan with it and I couldnt be happier.
    • Chris says,
      1 year ago
      The Landcruiser diesels are VERY relaxed to drive in manual form. Due to the GIGANTIC torque, you start off in 2nd most of the time, and if you're truly lazy go straight to 4th. Drove a manual Jeep the other day. Now that was hard work compared to the cruiser. Tons of power, but not a lot of torque.
  • jova says,
    2 years ago
    1 like
    I've had many conversations about this vehicle for over a decade with friends and couldn't understand why Toyota never brought out the double cab. There's no need for me to convert the troopy. Good stuff Toyota..
  • warwick says,
    2 years ago
    1 like
    I have had many a toyota l just got sick of overpriced dont get me wrong there a good 4x4 l ended up in 2004 going nissan 4.2 deisel still have it today took me a while to get used of it know l cant part with it we all make up owe own minds but toyota needs to drop there prices and even nissan are getting cheeky with uping there prices ld like to see the minds and big companys start looking around and looking at different brands its not like there hanging on to them for 20 years and help bring down the prices
    • Darren says,
      2 years ago
      Nissan vs Toyota - you'll find out when it's time for resale

      Good stuff Toyota
  • bob sands says,
    2 years ago
    2 likes
    ho what a feeling mad good unit but overpriced along time comming lets hope they get anouther v8 engine instaled
  • Will says,
    2 years ago
    Anyone that has doesn't understand why these cost so much compared to a hilux doesn't understand a land cruiser purpose or hasn't had the pleasure of owning one. On our farm we a few of these landcruisers and a couple of hiluxs. the hilux will give us about 100000kms or hard offroad work before needing to trade back in but a landcruiser will do about 200000kms before we look replacing them. I would expect the work they all endure is 3 times as hard any road work. Biggest downside to a landcruiser is there are no cheap second hand parts as the beasts never die.
  • Hoffy says,
    2 years ago
    Well done Toyota! Bravo! This is a beast of a dual cab. Been saying Toyota should have one of these for years. Hiluxs are pathetic for the cost, they should be called lightluxs because they are so tinny and light, just weak. I'd pick a 120 series prado over a hilux any day! By the way... Patrols are a poor mans cruiser! Just don't go there.
  • Richard says,
    2 years ago
    1 like
    The high price is for reliability and capability.
    3.5t towing capacity
    Solid front axle gives it real off road performance
    Weight of a real car not a P.O.S light 4x4 so it'll stay firmly planted on the ground
    Large doors, good room in cab for taller people. Try being over 6 foot and getting into a hilux without hitting your head all the time
    Understressed 4.5l V8 vs highly worked
    • Richard says,
      2 years ago
      Whole message didn't get posted.

      Long story short the v8 is more reliable and sounds better and is in a much better car
  • John Newman says,
    1 year ago
    This is an all time all terrain performance vehicle but why can't the automatic model be made?
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