Peter Anderson | Jul 17, 2012

Looking like the result of a collaboration between Batman and Darth Vader, Aspid's space-age Invictus GT-21 has been revealed this week.

Aspid's second-ever production car is a serious looking unit, and, on paper, a huge leap forward in almost every area.

The GT-21 kicks out almost 330kW from a BMW-sourced 4.4 litre V8, with all that power sent through either a seven-speed dual-clutch or six-speed manual.

Aspid says it will rip to 100km/h in under three seconds, on its way to a top speed of over 300km/h.

It's not all mouth, either, with the race-inspired chassis pulling 1.6g on the skidpan, an impressive result for a road car.

Part of the secret to the GT-21's speed is its incredible light weight - the composite panels clothe a spaceframe keeping the dry weight down to a sliver under a tonne. The monocoque weighs just 80kg.

"Aspid Cars is inspired by the motorsport and aerospace industries," Ignacio Fernandez, Aspid's founder and chief designer said.

"Their advanced lightweight technologies have been applied to our new GT, which is first and foremost a high performance road car."

The first Aspid, the Super Sport, was another lightweight wonder that looked like a cross between a Dodge Prowler and a Caterham Seven.

The Super Sport was powered by a 2.0 litre supercharged four-cylinder good for a staggering 288kW. It was terrifyingly fast, but also slightly terrifying to look at from some angles - something clearly fixed with the GT-21.

The GT-21 is considered by Aspid to be more of a next-generation Gran Turismo. To that end, it can be filled with creature comforts and safety features, and comes standard with a 2+2 seating configuration.

Each car will be hand-built in its own bay at the factory, rather than on a production line. This approach is a reminder of Aspid's roots - the parent company, IFR Automotive, was formed by a bunch of Spanish ex-rally engineers.

Customers will be able to choose from over a hundred options and can visit the factory while their car is being built. The car will be sold through a European network of twenty dealers.

Fernandez has high ambitions for the company, positioning it almost like Lotus' engineering arm or Prodrive.

"We aspire to build Aspid Cars as a brand representing design innovation and technological leadership, which through IFR Automotive can be applied to passenger, commercial and off highway vehicles," Fernandez said.

"We've already introduced into the market our technologies to small series cars, motorbikes, buses and coaches."

There is no pricing information available yet, but with the almost endless combinations available to the customer, not many will be paying the base price alone.