Males Over-represented In Vic Road Deaths: TAC

Mike Stevens | Dec 19, 2011

New statistics from Victoria's Transport Accident Commission show that male drivers are over-represented in the state's road toll, despite a near-equal gender split in the Victorian population.

The figures, which cover the 12 months up to October 31, show that 160 percent more men than women were killed on Victorian roads. In raw numbers, that's 194 male road deaths compared to 75 female deaths.

TAC boss Janet Dore said that while the past year has shown a 16 percent drop in male road fatalities, male drivers continue to take unnecessary risks on the road.

"TAC research regularly shows us that men don't believe speed cameras are effective and that speeding is okay, yet it is men who are more likely to be injured in collisions," Ms Dore said.

Data released earlier this year show that male motorists are more likely to speed and drink-drive, with a survey of 900 Victorian motorists revealing that males are "significantly more likely" to drive at near or over a .05 blood alcohol level, and to speed in 60 and 100km/h zones.

Male drivers are also more likely to be involved in collisions that result in hospitalisation, the statistics show, with 37 percent more men than women making TAC claims involving hospital admission.

Melbourne motorists - male and female - appear to be the hardest to reach, with hospital admissions up from 3461 to 3778 in 2011. By comparison, regional Victoria has shown a slight drop from 1787 to 1778.

There was one positive note to the data however, with motorcyclist fatalities falling 29 percent from 56 to 40.

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Filed under: victoria, road safety, transport accident commission, tac, fatalities, road toll, News, vic

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