Mike Stevens | Oct 27, 2011

A new survey in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory has found that parents and other supervisors are passing their bad habits on to young learner drivers.

The survey of 300 teenagers, conducted by NRMA Motoring & Services, found that 32 respondents have been exposed to speeding while travelling with parents or supervisors.

"All supervisors need to remember that when a learner is sitting next to them in the car they will copy the way they drive, so they need to be a model of good behaviour," NRMA Motoring & Services Director Coral Taylor said.

The survey also found that 38 percent of supervisors often drove without both hands on the steering wheel, and a worrying 19 percent drove while talking on a mobile phone without a hands-free system.

A further 19 percent regularly failed to indicate while turning, and 16 percent were guilty of road rage.

While it should be noted that the survey relied on the honesty of the young learner drivers and not of monitored driving situations, the results are worrying.

The respondents were not lacking faith in their supervisors, however:

"An overwhelming majority (88 percent) of students believed their parent or supervisor would pass a driving test, which tells us that learners have confidence in their teachers," Ms Taylor said.

"It’s the teachers who need to display good behaviour when they’re behind the wheel," Ms Taylor advised.

The survey also found that less than half (46 percent) of learners planned their driving lesson before getting in the car while 43 percent clashed with their parent or supervisor when they were driving.

"Both learner and supervisor should brush up on the road rules, consider what skills to cover during each lesson and ensure that the learner is experiencing a full range of driving conditions," Ms Taylor said.

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