Mike Stevens | Sep 6, 2010

Ferrari's race drivers have been summoned by the FIA to the forthcoming disciplinary hearing of the World Motor Sport Council.

That is the claim of the Spanish sports daily AS, which on Friday said both Fernando Alonso and Felipe Massa must appear either in person in Paris or via video link.

The pair swapped positions during July's German Grand Prix at Hockenheim, allegedly due to the imposition of an illegal team order.

Ferrari Team Principal Stefano Domenicali said before leaving Spa-Francorchamps last weekend that he was "sure the World Council will understand our point" on September 8.

But some, including Red Bull's Helmut Marko, are hoping the outcome will be a points loss for the Italian team and its drivers.

"No, I don't think so, we're relaxed," said Alonso last Sunday.

After Wednesday's hearing, it is expected the verdict will be published later that day.

As well as the drivers and legal team, boss Domenicali and Team Manager Massimo Rivola are also slated to be in attendance at Place de la Concorde.

(GMM)

 

Work Still To Be Done At Korea's F1 Track

Karun Chandhok lapped Korea's new Formula One track on Saturday, stating afterwards that the venue "needs a bit more work".

Speculation that the Yeongam circuit will not be ready for its October debut has been rampant, but the Indian driver sounded confident the F1 world will descend on the site as scheduled for the Championship's round 17.

"The garages and team buildings look pretty much finished," an excerpt of a statement issued by Red Bull quotes Chandhok as saying.

The 26-year-old completed 14 laps of the layout in last year's Red Bull car.

"The track itself needs a bit more work on the asphalt and the kerbs, but the organisers think it's all within their time-lines and are confident that it will be ready on time."

On Twitter, he admitted the track needs "a lot of work" to be done before the Grand Prix in seven weeks.

Indeed, photos of the circuit's debut laps on Saturday depicted construction workers and materials on the dirt verges, a lack of fencing in places, and the new asphalt's final layer yet to be laid.

And Chandhok said that grandstand seating is an issue.

"The main grandstand is finished although they need to put up other temporary grandstands because they don't have time to put up any more permanent ones," the HRT driver said.

"Everyone has been a bit doom and gloom about it (the venue) but it's actually not that bad," Chandhok is quoted by the BBC.

(GMM)

 

Ecclestone Admits 'Problems' With New Korea Track

Bernie Ecclestone on Sunday sounded defiant amid reports Korea is not ready to welcome Formula One.

Yeongam, about a four hour drive from Seoul, is scheduled to host its inaugural Grand Prix late next month.

Karun Chandhok did the first demonstration laps of the track on Saturday in a Red Bull, admitting that the venue is not yet complete.

Photos showed some buildings and grandstands are half built, fences missing, run-off areas unpaved and the track with only an initial layer of asphalt.

"How can a grand prix take place here?" wondered the German newspaper Bild am Sonntag, captioning a photo of a construction worker carrying materials against the backdrop of a half-built building.

The newspaper said even a full supply of water and electricity is not yet present.

Additionally, many seats in the main grandstand are not installed, while parking lots are not ready to accommodate cars.

"There are problems," F1 Chief Executive Ecclestone said, "but we assume that the race can take place.

"The circuit is definitely ready, but as for all the buildings, perhaps no."

"So we may have to put up some tents," Ecclestone joked.

(GMM)

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