Mike Stevens | Aug 3, 2010

An unofficial draft calendar for the 2011 season emerged in the paddock during the Hungarian Grand Prix weekend.

The leaked schedule, published in German by sport1, features an unprecedented 20 races, beginning in Bahrain on 13 March and ending with a 13 November finale in Abu Dhabi.

The extra race is the inaugural Indian Grand Prix, provisionally scheduled for 9 October.

Korea's second race is reportedly scheduled to take place in late April, instead of October as in 2010, and will be held just seven days after the Chinese grand prix.

After South Korea, there is a three-week break until Barcelona.

But like China-Korea, Australia (27 March) and the subsequent Malaysian Grand Prix are scheduled back-to-back, as are Germany and Hungary in late July and Belgium-Valencia in late August.

It means this year's four-week summer break in August has been reduced to just three weeks in 2011.

And the flyaway Japan-Brazil double-header in late October will be a real logistical challenge.

(GMM)

 

Vettel Mistake Shows Learning Curve: Horner

The drive-through penalty that cost Sebastian Vettel victory in Hungary shows he still has much to learn.

That is the assessment of the German's own Red Bull boss Christian Horner, after Niki Lauda scolded 23-year-old Vettel for not simply admitting to "screwing up".

Vettel vented his anger by gesticulating from the cockpit whilst serving the penalty, and while driving into parc ferme after the race hitting the marker board with his front wing.

The German was penalised for falling too far behind the safety car at the restart, and while waiting to go onto the podium pleaded with FIA officials that his mistake had been "not intentional".

"Somewhere in the first stint I lost the radio connection. (And) I didn't see the lights (on the safety car go out)," he explained.

"Also Mark (Webber) -- usually the leader when he does the re-start tries to drop back and then dictates the pace," added Vettel.

Boss Horner responded: "It's premature to blame the radio for this one. He's obviously frustrated after today but it's part of a learning curve and there's seven races to go."

Former Super Aguri driver and now BBC radio commentator Anthony Davidson blamed both Vettel and his team.

"He clearly didn't know about the safety car rule but it's the team's job to make sure the driver knows the rules," said the Briton.

(GMM)

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