Mike Stevens | May 14, 2010

IN THE WAKE of the USF1 calamity, another American group has signalled its intention to race in Formula One next year.

Cypher Group confirmed on Thursday that it has submitted a "letter of interest" about obtaining the 13th and final spot on the 2011 grid.

The company said it consists of "experienced F1 engineers, designers and businessmen" whose objective "is to create a successful US-based F1 team".

Cypher said it "recognises the significant challenges" of building a team in a short amount of time and will therefore "utilise 'best of breed' components throughout the car".

"In support of this strategy Cypher is in contact with established manufacturers of formula one racing cars and components," the outfit added.

"Our aims are ultimately to be competitive and provide unrivalled access and interaction for our supporters whilst maintaining high standards of integrity and values, alongside creative out of the box thinking."

Cypher clarified that it has not yet lodged a formal entry to compete next year, saying it will only do so "should we achieve fully the budget we believe is necessary to do this properly".

"We are not in this to embarrass America, the fans or ourselves. We simply want to give America the shot it deserves."

(GMM)

 

Teams Accused Of Wanting Monaco 'Chaos' And 'Controversy'

MICHAEL Schumacher and Martin Whitmarsh have accused some team bosses of wanting "chaos" and "controversy" to reign on the streets of Monaco this weekend.

At a meeting last week in Barcelona, the bosses voted on a drivers' proposal that 'Q1' qualifying be split into two parts for this weekend's fabled street event.

With a busy grid in 2010 and six cars that are not up to speed, drivers fear not only that the traffic will impede their ability to set proper lap times, but that the situation could be dangerous.

But Lotus Team Boss Tony Fernandes admits to having vetoed the vote, arguing that he wants F1 "to be exciting ... to be unpredictable".

McLaren's Whitmarsh expects the unpredictability to be in the form of a litany of stewards enquiries about blocking.

"There are those, and I'm not one of them, who feel that controversy and stewards' hearings after the event are entertaining. I don't share that view," he said.

Seven-time world champion Schumacher also expressed disappointment with Fernandes' line of reasoning.

"Some team bosses felt that they'd rather have the chaos and may take the profit from (that) than to have a reasonable, clean qualifying," he said on Wednesday.

"Let's see who has to suffer or not."

Almost every driver, from either end of the grid, spoke on Wednesday about the traffic situation.

Spanish reports quote Fernando Alonso as neatly summarising: "It will definitely not be easy, but it's the same for everyone."

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