Mike Stevens | Mar 31, 2010

FIA PRESIDENT Jean Todt will respond to the lingering saga following incidents involving Lewis Hamilton and Mark Webber during the 2010 Australian GP.

Lewis Hamilton was charged by local Victorian police for doing a burnout on public roads late on Friday, prompting Mark Webber to slam the "nanny state" road laws that now exist in Australia.

Following high-level meetings in Australia on Tuesday, race promoter Ron Walker said Todt will respond by informing teams with a "protocol" covering all the host nations on the the F1 calendar.

"The protocol will be about a list of what can be done in this country and the rules and regulations for the (other) places they visit," he said.

"I actually don't think he (Hamilton) knew he was breaking any laws or would have any problems doing wheel spin-outs."

(GMM)

 

McLaren Admits Victory Repeat In Malaysia Unlikely

TWO DAYS AFTER Jenson Button scored McLaren's first win of the 2010 season, the British team has warned that a repeat in Malaysia this weekend is unlikely.

The MP4-25 car was better suited to Melbourne than it had been at the Bahrain season opener, but reigning world champion Button said on Tuesday: "I think we travel to Sepang mindful that the characteristics of the (Sepang) circuit probably won't suit our car as well as it will suit some of the others."

Teammate Lewis Hamilton played up the situation, noting that this year's car "will be far better" in Malaysia than its predecessor was a year ago, when it qualified just 13th at Sepang.

But team boss Martin Whitmarsh said the Woking based team is "under no illusions" that it will be the "regular pacesetters" - presumably Red Bull and Ferrari - who will be "up at the front" this weekend.

Button, however, is not ruling out his chances of defending his title in 2010, with his Melbourne win propelling him to within 6 points of Fernando Alonso's early lead.

"I always thought the (2010) title might be on. It's a long season," the Briton is quoted by the Mirror.

(GMM)

 

Heidfeld 'Struggling' To Adapt As F1 Reserve

NICK HEIDFELD has revealed his struggle to adapt to merely watching qualifying at the Grands Prix from the reserve bench.

After holding out for the race seat in 2010, the 32-year-old is instead Mercedes' reserve driver, due to Michael Schumacher deciding to mount a return to F1 following three years of retirement.

"It feels strange, especially when it's just before qualifying, I'm struggling with it," he told the German national newspaper FAZ.

"Before, it (qualifying) was always a moment where you had the adrenaline rush and then off you went. I really miss it," said Heidfeld, who will be present for all 19 races this year in case Schumacher or Nico Rosberg are unable to race.

Heidfeld insists he does not regret his decision to turn down lesser offers this year in the hope of finding a "top team" to race with.

"I am convinced that I will get a place in a (race) car again, although of course I am worried and would prefer to be there now."

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