Victorian Government To Use Noise Cameras From March

| Feb 25, 2010

VICTORIAN ROADS AND PORTS Minister Tim Pallas announced this week that VicRoads will begin using a new noise camera system to monitor heavy vehicles from March.

Mr Pallas said the cameras form part of the Victorian Government's commitment to reducing excessive truck noise on the state's roads.

“We understand people are concerned about trucks on our roads, which is why the Brumby Labor Government is taking action to build a better transport system and move trucks away from residential streets,” Mr Pallas said.

“Not all heavy vehicles emit excessive noise, but loud engine brakes are inappropriate in built up areas and can affect a community’s quality of life.

The system is designed to recognise excessively noisy trucks, triggering the camera to take a photo and record the noise level of the offending vehicle, the location and time of the event.

The new noise cameras will allow VicRoads to enforce the heavy vehicle national noise emission standards across Victoria, with non-compliance ultimately resulting in suspension of a truck’s registration.

“If over the permitted on-road noise level standards, the vehicle owner will receive a notice of non-compliance,” he said.

“The truck would then need to be presented to an approved EPA Victoria noise testing station to ensure compliance. Failure to do so will result in suspension of the vehicle’s registration.

“This Government understands and values the importance of the freight industry, but it must work with the community and adhere to noise minimisation regulations.

Mr Pallas acknowledged that while most heavy vehicles are generally fitted with modern muffler systems to minimise engine braking noise.

Some of the areas being initially targeted by VicRoads include Geelong Ring Road, near Waurn Ponds, Frankston, Yarraville, Buninyong and Southbank.

Mr Pallas did not say if the cameras would also be used to identify loud passenger vehicles and motorcycles. TMR has contacted the Minister's office for comment - watch this space.

Filed under: victoria, vicroads, tim pallas, trucks, News, noise, noise cameras, freight, noise pollution

Leave a comment:

Required
Required
Enter comment here.
  • Wheelnut
    Wheelnut says,
    4 years ago
    I assume that it could also be used to take photographs of the ricer boys in their "doof-doof" boom boxes
    - where the stereo has more power and [in some cases] is worth more than the actual car
  • John Lambert says,
    4 years ago
    It seems that the ALP Victoria is again setting out to prosecute truck drivers and owners operating legally while they won’t touch other roadusers operating illegally. See article at bottom of this email.

    Australian Design Rules noise requirements set the noise limits in drive by testing (this is the testing that most reflects the experience of residents) at:
    1. For petrol engine passenger vehicles 77 dB(A); See Table 1 on page 8 of Australian Design Rules 39/00; and
    2. For the largest diesel engine trucks and buses 86 or 87 dB(A) See Table 1 on page 4 of Australian Design Rules 28/01

    While BHP’s Technical Manager Road and Rail Transport I was required to check the compliance of the Sydney Steel mill at Rooty Hill with environmental noise requirements. Checks showed that:
    1. The biggest noise problem detectible was motor cycle exhausts – most of these are illegal on noise and emissions grounds;
    2. Followed by passenger trains travelling in the Steel Mill area;
    3. Then passenger vehicles with load and illegal exhaust systems.
    Heavy vehicle noise including engine brake noise was not an issue – one HV engine brake application was noted over the 12 hours from 6 pm to 6 am.

    I have spent months on the Victorian Great Ocean Road since 2000 and can attest to the fact that the situation in respect of nuisance noise is:
    1. Motorcycles – more than 90% of the problem - most of these are illegal on noise and emissions grounds;
    2. Then passenger vehicles with load and illegal exhaust systems; and
    3. Then heavy trucks – virtually a non-problem.

    And I have spent months living and working on St Kilda Road near its intersection with Toorak road. The situation in respect of nuisance noise is:
    1. Trams – the noise and vibrations from their steel wheels crossing joins in the rails; then
    2. Motorcycles – most of these are illegal on noise and emissions grounds; and
    3. Then passenger vehicles with loud and illegal exhaust systems.
    I cannot remember a noisy heavy trucks, or a heavy truck operating a noisy exhaust brake.

    And my observations across all my travels, working and living across Australia are similar. Heavy vehicle truck noise and engine brake noise is generally never an issue EXCEPT where road authorities build long steep grades (at least 4% slope) where trucks have to use full power going up these slopes to try and minimise speed differentials (a differential of 20 km/h – e.g. a truck doing 80 km/h in a 100 km/h zone where cars are doing 100 km/h – increases crash rates by 8 times), and have to use engine/exhaust brakes on the down slope to avoid overheating normal brakes and losing braking due to brake fade. I live several 100 metres from one of these, being the Geelong Ring Road in the Wandana Drive area. In this case any fault for irritating noise levels is VicRoads fault – they selected the grade – 5.5% - and they failed to build the sound walls the Noise Consultants stated were mandatory (yet they built sound walls elsewhere where there are no houses????).

    So my questions to Ministers and regulators generally are:
    1. “Why do you pick on heavy trucks when the vast majority are legal under Australian Design Rules and EPA regulations”; and conversely
    2. “Why do EPA, Police and VicRoads/RTA enforcement authorities ignore the large number of illegal motorcycles.”

    Note that many of these illegal motorcycles are modified by the original suppliers and/or dealers by removing the exhaust system fitted when it’s compliance was determined, and fitting noisy alternatives.

    And a further question: “Why is it that any aftermarket auto supply store and any aftermarket exhaust dealer can sell exhaust systems to vehicle owners without be required to advise the purchaser of the exhaust system that fitting of that system to their vehicle makes it illegal UNLESS an authorised engineer or similar person approves the modification?

    It’s time Ministers and Regulators got of the trucking industry’s back – the drivers of large heavy vehicles after all are the safest drivers on Australia’s roads on a fatality per 100 million kilometres basis even though their vehicle braking distances are 70% - 90% longer than for passenger cars, they are much more likely to rollover because of the physical limits associated with carrying high loads; and the roads are not built for heavy vehicles.
  • John Lambert says,
    4 years ago
    Somehow my previous message was corrupted/ did not copy correctly – should state:

    Australian Design Rules noise requirements set the noise limits in drive by testing (this is the testing that most reflects the experience of residents) at:
    1. For petrol engine passenger vehicles 77 dB(A); See Table 1 on page 4 of Australian Design Rules 28/01;
    2. For motorcycles 82 dB(A); See Table 1 on page 8 of Australian Design Rules 39/00; and
    3. For the largest diesel engine trucks and buses 86 or 87 dB(A) See Table 1 on page 4 of Australian Design Rules 28/01.
    • Peter Brown says,
      2 years ago
      NTC National Transport Commission. Have carried out a series of test over the last few years on heavy duty trucks using air/exhaust brakes.The test revealed that 3% of trucks in every 5000 that's 150 trucks.Which have muffler systems fitted (to deaden the noise from the air/exhaust brakes)have proved to be faulty.In turn these faulty mufflers take the brake noise level over the legislated Dba rating level.The 3% fall into the following category's.
      1.Mufflers fitted incorrectly. 2.Wrong type of muffler fitted.3.Condition of muffler deteriorated. 4.muffle deliberately damaged to make excessive noise.
      Q..Why is it that trucks driving within the speed limit, say 60Klm need to use their air/exhaust brakes. Q..Why do truck drivers ignore signs that request them "Not" to use air/exhaust brakes within a certain area,IE: Township.Q..When a noise fine is sent to the company concerned,who pays the fine driver or company?..
      • HCrossland says,
        2 years ago
        Usually the signs( do not use noisy brakes )are going down a hill ,its either use the brakes or burn out your brakes by not using them ,and smash at the bottom of the hill .Who are these people who set these signs up, i bet they have never driven a truck at all.

advertisement