2010 Toyota Landcruiser 76 Series GXL Wagon Road Test and Review

Overall Rating

  • Country of Origin
    JAPAN
  • Price
    $62,640 (plus on-road costs)
  • Engine
    8 Cylinders
  • Output
    151 kW / 430 Nm
  • Transmission
    Manual
  • ANCAP Rating
    N/A
  • Airbags
    Driver & Passenger (Dual)
  • L/100 km
    11.9
  • C02
    313 g/km
  • Luggage Capacity
    770 L
  • Towing (braked)
    3500 kg
  • Towing (unbraked)
    750 kg
Tony O'Kane | Jan 18, 2010 | 61 Comments

2010 Toyota Landcruiser 76 Series GXL Wagon Road Test and Review

FOR AS LONG as Toyota has been in Australia, the indomitable LandCruiser has been its ultimate 'tough as nails' workhorse.

In fact, when the first batch of early-model LandCruisers chugged off the boat in 1958, destined for the Snowy Mountains Hydroelectric Scheme, that day heralded the company's arrival on these shores.

Since then, the LandCruiser has forged a million paths into Australia's forests, farms and deserts, bashed its way in and out of outback mines, through construction sites and up fire-trails and earned an enviable reputation for versatility, ruggedness and dependability.

The latest iteration of the industry-spec LandCruiser formula is the 70 Series. Mid last year, Toyota freshened it up with some mild updates - so we thought it was time to put it through its paces.

We took a top-of-the-line LandCruiser 76 GXL Wagon high into Victoria’s snow country to see just how good the humble ‘Cruiser is off-road – and whether it can still match its reputation.

Styling

Looking at the LandCruiser 76 is like gazing into a time warp – the basic 70 Series body has been around since 1984.

Front-end styling was altered in 2007 to accommodate the larger V8 engine that was introduced at the same time, which resulted in the deletion of the traditional front wings, inboard headlights and ear-like indicator housings.

A large letterbox-style scoop was added to the bonnet, and feeds cold air to the engine’s top-mounted intercooler. The front bumper was elongated in July 2009 to enable the fitment of airbags, and it also incorporates a handy stepping surface on its topside.

Other than that, the 70 Series sports an almost anachronistic design; a design that features nary a curved surface and pays little heed to modern vehicle styling conventions.

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Traditionalists will love it. LandCruiser die-hards will be pleased to see that Toyota has largely resisted the urge to mess with the basic form of its hard-working off-roader.

The front bumper and plastic fender flares are painted in grey, with chrome-finish inlays on the front bumper. The rear bumper is made of chrome-plated steel, and incorporates an aluminium step in the centre.

There’s no recovery point on the rear bumper as standard, however there is provision for one to be installed.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_33

Alloy sidesteps are factory fitment, and a pair of foglights are fixed to the front bumper. The rear doors are split 60/40, and the spare wheel is carried on the larger door.

For the GXL, 16x7-inch alloys are the standard wheel and wear 265/70R16 Dunlop Grandtreks.

Interior

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_52_interior

As with the outside, there’s a definite sense of nostalgia when sitting in the LandCruiser 76’s cabin.

Hard plastics, exposed sheetmetal, and a dashboard that could probably be used as a setsquare characterise the LandCruiser’s interior with styling best described as “utilitarian”. Function dominates form in here. This cabin is designed to be rugged and useful, not pretty.

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But that’s not to say Toyota hasn’t tried to refine it. The dashboard is a new design that features (slightly) softer styling, a reconfigured centre stack, repositioned air outlets, provision for the passenger airbag and a plastic glovebox lid instead of the old metal one.

Another addition for 2009 – a single bottle holder has been bolted to the transmission tunnel, to the side of the gearshift.

The new dashboard is taller than the one it’s replaced, and the passenger grab handle has been lost in the transition. There are still grab handles on the A and B-pillars as well as above the doors though.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_56_interior

The front seats adjust for slide and backrest tilt, but height is fixed. At the wheel you constantly feel like you’re towering over other traffic – which in truth, you are. The seats aren’t especially comfortable for long journeys, and they struggle to hold you in place during proper off-roading.

Trimmed in cloth, the interior of the GXL is at least slightly more luxurious than the vinyl-clad interior of the lower-spec Workmate.

The steering wheel adjusts for reach as well as rake, and the new four-spoke design is comfortable to hold. The floor-mounted shifter for the 5-speed manual gearbox is long and comes within easy reach, while the new layout for the centre stack puts most buttons further up and closer to the driver.


2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_57_interior

All-around visibility is good, however the wider mirrors of the cab-chassis LandCruiser 79 would do much to improve rearward vision on the wagon.

The rear bench is flat and, like the front seats, not particularly comfortable for long stints. Your fellow tradesmen won’t complain, but your family probably will.

Folding the seats out of the way is an easy process that involves flipping two catches and tumbling the rear bench forward, unlocking even more luggage room in the Wagon’s already cavernous interior.

More storage space is available in the centre console box and glovebox, while the front doors are fitted with narrow map pockets.

Equipment and Features

In terms of equipment, there’s not much to see inside the LandCruiser 76. In 2009 Toyota Australia updated the 70-Series range with a few modest additions to the car’s spec sheet, but the car is still incredibly Spartan by modern standards.

Safety equipment saw the biggest changes, with dual front airbags added to the LandCruiser’s standard equipment list.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_51_interior

Other safety aids such as ABS, traction control or stability control are conspicuously absent however, and the centre position on the rear bench makes do with a lap-only seatbelt.

The audio system has been comprehensively upgraded, with the double-DIN unit from the Corolla being grafted into the LandCruiser’s dashboard.

A simple AM/FM tuner with a slot-loading single CD player, the headunit pipes sound to four speakers and features both 3.5mm and USB auxillary inputs for portable music players. Bluetooth integration for mobile phones is standard.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_46_interior

A handy feature of the audio system is the power retractable aerial mast, which can be raised or lowered from the driver's seat via a button mounted on the dash.

It’s not exactly cutting-edge tech, but it does mean there’s no longer any excuse for snagging (and bending) the aerial on overhanging foliage.

Air-conditioning is optional, but power windows on all four passenger doors are standard. The wing mirrors can only be adjusted manually, however.

Mechanical Package

The centerpiece of the LandCruiser 70 Series is its 4.5 litre turbodiesel V8 engine. With a single turbocharger pumping air into its eight cylinders, the LandCruiser’s V8 churns out 151kW at 3400rpm and 430Nm between 1200-3200rpm.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_16

A snorkel is standard, allowing the Toyota’s engine to breathe easy when fording streams. A 90 litre fuel tank supplies the engine with diesel, and fuel consumption is claimed to be 11.9 l/100km.

Our own combined cycle testing produced an average fuel economy figure of 11.27 l/100km, giving the Wagon a theoretical maximum range of 798km.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_47_interior

A five-speed manual gearbox is the only transmission choice and feeds the V8’s output into a dual-range transfer case, which in turn takes drive to either the rear wheels or all four wheels.

Switching between 2WD high-range, 4WD high-range and 4WD low-range is done via a lever next to the gearshift, and the transmission can be completely decoupled from the wheels via the neutral position.

A rear limited slip differential is standard, but can be replaced by optional electronically-locking front and rear diffs.

Locking each diff is achieved by turning a simple rotary switch mounted on the dashboard, making extricating the car from slippery surfaces an easier task. The front wheel hubs have a freewheeling function, but must be manually set to do so.

Much like the rest of the car, the LandCruiser 70’s suspension is strictly old-school. Solid live axles connect the front and rear wheels, with the front sprung by coils and the rear by leaf springs. The body is mounted on a separate ladder-frame chassis, improving strength.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_17

Steering is power-assisted, but the live-axle setup necessitates a recirculating-ball system instead of a more-precise rack and pinion setup.

Four-piston fixed calipers are mounted to the front hubs and grip 322mm ventilated discs, while single-piston sliding calipers are paired with 312mm ventilated discs at the rear.

The Drive

The LandCruiser 70 Series is, first and foremost, a work vehicle, and that manifests itself in its on-road driving behaviour.

Around town and on the highway, the big Toyota is a little hard to live with. The recirculating ball steering is imprecise and not particularly direct, the turning circle – officially listed as being 12.6 metres kerb-to-kerb – feels excessively wide, the door-mounted spare tyre cuts rearward vision and the suspension is jiggly over choppy tarmac.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_26

On the upshot, there’s loads of torque available from that V8 and taking off from traffic lights in second gear is a cinch on level ground. In fact, we'd recommend it – first gear is super-short and using it results in revs rising much too quickly.

Short gearing also makes highway driving a noisy affair. At 100km/h the engine is turning over at around 2400rpm in fifth gear - much too high for a diesel engine with such exceptional low-rpm performance. The LandCruiser would definitely benefit from a sixth ratio for high-speed driving.

The LandCruiser 76 Wagon weighs 2190kg when empty, but whether from standstill or when overtaking the engine is more than capable of shifting it at a reasonable rate. The gearshift is a little baulky, but our test car had around 200km when we picked it up and the shifter may loosen up with use.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_32

The brakes are strong, but there’s never any doubt that the car they’re attached to is very heavy indeed. On the plus side, a sustained downhill run at 80-100km/h didn’t challenge them, and we never experienced any significant fade.

Once taken off the beaten track, the LandCruiser 76 comes into its own. The overly firm ride exhibited on sealed roads disappears and is replaced by a well-damped chassis that works best on gravel and dried mud.

With low-range 4WD selected and the nose pointed towards more challenging terrain, the ‘Cruiser is incredibly impressive.

Off road in the 'Cruiser is like being in a Leopard tank... nothing stands in its way, it will simply grind its way up and over the toughest terrain. Little wonder so many are pressed into duty day-in and day-out along near-impassable trails with the SES and CFA - and deep into open-cut mines.


2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_42

Steep hills can be descended using engine braking alone and sharp ascents tackled with the V8 virtually at idle. On these trails, the 'loose' steering suddenly makes sense – it enables the driver to place the front wheels with greater precision, and minimizes kickback from ruts, rocks and errant tree stumps.

Thanks to the archaic live-axle suspension, wheel articulation is excellent. All four wheels follow the contours of heavily-weathered tracks with ease, and traction is outstanding.

Our off-road testing occurred during one of Victoria’s drier weekends, but with our tester fitted with the optional locking differentials, we get the feeling muddier surfaces would pose no challenge for the LandCruiser 76.

2010_toyota_landcruiser_76_wagon_gxl_70-series_road-test-review_40

Ground clearance measures up at 215mm on the GXL (230mm on the Workmate), but at no stage did its belly scrape the ground. If it did though, steel bash plates on the transfer case offer some protection for the drivetrain.

The Verdict

The LandCruiser 76 barely broke a sweat on our off-road sojourn, and it’s clearly capable of so much more.

With space for five workers and all their gear it’s an obvious choice for industries like mining, logging, forestry, construction and the emergency services. But with its exceptional off-road performance, it’s a good pick for 4WD enthusiasts too.

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Its capabilities in the bush compromise its livability in the city though, and there’s no denying that its interior is incredibly Spartan compared to other modern cars.

At a starting price of $58,540 for the LandCruiser 76 Wagon it’s also rather expensive. Potential customers could be forgiven for going to other less-focussed vehicles with more luxury, more comfort or better looks on offer.

But if you need to get somewhere out in Australia’s wild expansive wilderness and you want the best tool for the job, do what countless Australians have been doing since 1958 – choose a LandCruiser.

Follow Tony O'Kane on Google+

Filed under: review, wagon, BMW, Toyota, 70 series, toyota landcruiser 70 series, diesel, 6 series, bmw 6 series, 4wd, Toyota Landcruiser, family, enthusiast, 8cyl, toyota landcruiser 76 series, toyota landcruiser gxl, toyota landcruiser 76 series gxl

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  • jbot says,
    5 years ago
    5 likes
    Way too expensive for what it is. There is no excuse to leave out ABS, traction control and other lifesaving equipment when you're paying $60,000 for a vehicle....
  • MRMARK says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    Way over priced for what it is. And toyota where lazy considering they just bolted a newer engine and front end onto the 1980's prado and then ask $60k for it........what a joke.
  • Troy says,
    5 years ago
    15 likes
    Way over priced, I dont agree! If you want a flashy looking, state of the art, look at me machine this is not the car for you. If the ability to tackle tough terrain with confidence, unmatched reliability and awesome towing power, this is the car for you. Why try and reinvent something that performs so well, these things are bullet proof. An initial high retail price becomes insignificant after 10 years of total dependability and reliability. In the isolation of the outback, you need a car which will bring you home safely again time after time, nothing will do it better than this vehicle. Sure it doent have all the mod cons and bells and whistle's, but its not a make believe, plastic, gutless 4x4 either. I'll take performance over looks any time.
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    12 likes
    Too Right Troy!!
    A real man's truck!!
  • Campagnola says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    NOT expensive, compared to what?

    The only other 4x4 that offers similar [no, not that oil leaking Pommy job] is the Iveco Masiff, it would be superior to this in every way but even a bit more expensive again....
  • Wheelnut says,
    5 years ago
    I have been in one of these and would have to agree with Tony; that the seats offer very little support particularly when you are being thrown around as the suspension has trouble dealing with the undulations of your average outback bush track etc..
    Some side bolsters and maybe a spring mounted drivers seat would be handy

    There is very little difference between the GXL and the entry level :Troop Carrier" to justify the premium price
    Although they have finally replaced the cassette deck with a CD player - WOW
  • Carl says,
    5 years ago
    How did they manage to get so little power and torque out of 4.5 litre turbo diesel????? lazy lazy lazy in my opinion Toyota are yesterday hero not long before they get knocked off their lazy little perch!!!
    • Dan says,
      1 year ago
      1 like
      the vehicle has been detuned for the 76 as the vehicles design is not made for a performance v8 setup like the 200 series, the engine is capable of a very high output of power, but why do you need all that power, all you would be doing is wasting fuel to get to the same place
    • Gus says,
      7 months ago
      Yes..Toyota are finished and they know it. They have moved overseas and this lifts the imported vehicle tax which is what GM has been trying to do to change our market to US vehicles. Yes, toyota are finished, hello GMC, Duramax and Powerstroke F250's. I own a 76, and only because of the import taxes on GMC's. Give me a 6.6 duramax anyday.
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    4 likes
    When going get tough, nothing goes better!!

    Carl, serious work horses such as these have detuned motors...
    This is to help the motor, and the vehicle last longer in the tough!!
  • MRMARK says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    I was not saying this aint a tough 4X4 but just pointing out Toyota is charger so much for what is a 25yo chassis and body eg old Prado that has had some newer part added and then sold for a ridiculous price. I spotted what I thought was one of theses out on the bush track but then noticed the front end looked different and talking to the owner is when I found out the age of the so called new LC. So my point was its overpriced for what it is....that is its an OLD 4x4 with a few changes to make it look newer. Apart from the engine there's nothing in the toyota that makes it worth the money there asking for it. Why did they kill off the old LC and replace it with a chassis/body that's just as old calling it NEW.
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    3 likes
    MrMark, if the LC76 is overpriced, i sopouse you won't have any problems poinitng me to a cheaper v8 4wd with twin solid axles??

    Also who cares how old it, it has desirable components for a real 4wd enthusiast, something you and your soft-roader crew willl probably never get!!
  • MRMARK says,
    5 years ago
    Tomas79 I dont drive a soft roader thanks. I do drive an 80 series landcruiser though and with the lift kit I go places others cant. The fact its based on such an old chassis should mean toyota could build them for a lot less than something newer such as a new prado but the price they ask is out of line with what it would cost them to make. All twin solid axle 4x4 of the past where a lot tougher (Rougher) than the modern ones but if toyota canned the 200 series and asked 80k for a 60 series landcruiser with a few changes to make it look newer whould you say that was good value still?
    • dawson says,
      1 month ago
      Ur basically paying for the name just like iPhone and Samsung
  • Cheeseburger says,
    5 years ago
    But if it's just to go off road and that's its only purpose, why the hell spend that much.

    There's this thing called a Land Rover Defender, it will decimate any LandCruiser, no matter how overpriced.
    • Campagnola says,
      1 year ago
      4 likes
      But if it's just to go off road and that's its only purpose, why the hell spend that much.

      There's this thing called a Land Rover Defender, it will decimate any LandCruiser, no matter how overpriced.


      In a workshop?sadlaughlaughlaughlaughlaughlaughlaughlaughlaughlaugh
    • Pablo says,
      1 year ago
      1 like
      How did they manage to get so little power and torque out of 4.5 litre turbo diesel????? lazy lazy lazy in my opinion Toyota are yesterday hero not long before they get knocked off their lazy little perch!!!


      They like to have reliability as #1, this is something any brand can match! Just Toyota is the only brand that you use if your depends on it, everybody who knows a bit about cars and without fanaticism will know that!
    • Pablo says,
      1 year ago
      1 like
      I am a Costarican and we have lots of bad roads and excessive humidity in my country, Costa Rica is like a test field for the real 4x4 vehicles.
      I had a Land Rover vehicle, also, I had driven several versions of the brand. I own currently a series 76 Toyota and also had driven several types of the brand... there is NOT comparison in reliability between a problematic Land Rover and a trusty Toyota!
      I prefer to pay the price... for the new Toyota, I also paid the price for the Land Rover but in parts, mechanics and patience!!!
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    2 likes
    You mean the more expensive defender.
    The Landcruiser with it's factory fitted diff-locks totally decimates the defender offroad, absolutely no challenge!!
    The defender has even a crapier engine, and a crappy sitting position!!
  • Wheelnut says,
    5 years ago
    Does it really matter which 4x4 is better off road? given that less than 10% of 4x4s sold actually go off road.. the closest most 4x4s would get to going off road these days - is the local school car park.

    BTW - whilst a number of Toyotas were used on the Snowy River Scheme; there were actually more VWs.
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    Lol, Well most of these 4wds are actually used offroad!!

    Wheelnut, have you actually got verifiable numbers of the vehicles used??

    Also the wast majority of used in mining industry are toyota's, anything else is only considered when the waiting list just gets too great... I have even seen mining companies even go looking for good condition second hand toyota's once the waiting list was too long...
  • Cheeseburger says,
    5 years ago
    Tomas79, the Defender starts at $44,990 ie more expensive than $58,540.

    The Landcruiser will ground itself long before the Defender will. A much longer wheelbase will see to that. Diff locks can't save you from everything.
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    If you comparing a swb defender 90, to a lwb landcuiser workhorse, thats hardly a work horse in the same league...

    Difflocks can't save you from everything, nothing can, but it will help you get over most obstacles with easy....
    For this simple reason the landcuiser beats defender offroad. Don't have to even mention the defender's crappy engine, and crappy seating position1!!
  • Campagnola says,
    5 years ago
    4 likes
    Comment by Cheeseburger
    January 19, 2010 @ 5:46 pm

    But if it’s just to go off road and that’s its only purpose, why the hell spend that much.

    There’s this thing called a Land Rover Defender, it will decimate any LandCruiser, no matter how overpriced

    LOL

    On your fantasy mind

    The L/R will be great for putting your mechanics kids through private-school, paying for his 1st class round world trip, and putting in his swimming pool.

    Yeah the L.S\R junkbox will win that prize as it has for decades!!!!

    LOL
  • Troy says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    Landrover decimate one of these............ Ha ha ha ha ha ha.

    Wheelnut, i do actually think it matters how a 4x4 performs offroad considering thats why they are 4x4 to start with. You can go the flashy looking numbers and look like a total goof when you hit the dirt and the going gets tough. But if you only used it to drive to the local coffee shop for a double decaf latte and a cream and jam scone as part of the overall status symbol, this car would look like a pile of snot to you.

    Seriously guys, get real. Ive owned one of these beasts for the last 2 yrs and yes they can and are quite uncomfortable in the rough as the review states. Ive completed the canning stock route, gibb river road, cape leveque track, travelled to the tip of cape york, arnem land, mitchell plateau etc etc and have never had an issue. these things are basic as, no frills but the just perform day in day out. You can seriously punish these vehicles offroad and this is where they truly shine. you wont impress any of your high flying mates with the standard trim and old school looks but you will tow them out of places you have quite easily conquered, thats what this thing is for , serious off road use, end of story.
  • MRMARK says,
    5 years ago
    5 likes
    Troy you admit its basic as hell yet your happy to have payed so much for it? Toyota love people like you who really boost there profit margins. Cant believe how gullible people are into paying so much for so little. You could have brought one of the import prado's with low k's for around $10k when they where bringing them into oz and while it did not have the v8 TD its still just as good off road. If people like you are happy to spend so much for an old vehicle thats had a mild face lift then good for you (and toyotas bottom line) I have been all over Australia in my 80 series but I sure the hell did not pay what it would have cost for a 70 series even after all the mods I have done to it. The only reason toyota get away with such prices on this vehicle is due to the amount of units they sell to the mining company's. Now I work for a company that deals with one of the biggest dealers who provide theses 4x4's the the mines (Pilbara motor group) And they dont pay anything like the retail price but most of the sales go via this means so the retail market is just the icing on the cake for toyota and the fact people pay the full retail price for them is amazing. The mine use them since all they need is a basic 4x4 and they get a good return on them when they trade them in (Silly people paying good money for ex mine 4x4's.......fools) If toyota lost the fleet sales to the mines and so on then the only way they could compete is to drop the price down to one that in line with what it cost them to make such a vehicle and that would be far lower than what there asking for it now. As anyone who has any idea on how the car industry works will know that a new cars price reflects the cost of devolving a new vehicle eg tooling up the factory and design cost bringing a new vehicle to market and over the life ( 10 years) the asking price is set to return the costs of development plus profit and then its done all over again with the next generation of vehicle. But hey this design is 25 years old so apart from some minor cost in revamping it to make it look a bit newer there is no real cost to toyota to pay back as its long been payed for so they can/should be selling it for far less than if they had just designed a new vehicle from the ground up. I am sure toyota appreciates people like the ones making comments in favor of the pricing since they really boast there profit margins. Well done toyota. Now ill stick to my 80 series as its also a real old school type 4x4 but if toyota was to re-release it with a few changes and asking 60+k for it ill be sure to tell them to go jump. I would consider updating my cruiser if they dropped the price down to what the 70 series was really worth. End rant.
    • 562Omar says,
      1 year ago
      I would have to agree. My FJ62 can ride any trail that the 70 series can do.
  • MRMARK says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    And before you fan boys jump in telling me why I am wrong ill just say I have been in the off road community and a hard core 4x4 member for over 20 years. I do think the 70 series is a fantastic old school offroader but I have enough brains to know an over priced vehicle when I see one.
  • Cheeseburger says,
    5 years ago
    If you guys (TMR) are going to edit my comment, why don't you just say I love this car and that I'm a fanboi too.

    What a joke this comments system is.
  • Wheelnut says,
    5 years ago
    Yeah - at least Steane and the guys who run TMR actually watch what's going on on the site; and enforce the code of conduct... unlike on another Car Advice website which I shall not name....
    where they let people make off topic inciteful offensive derogatory comments as well as personal insults/attacks.- and don't edit or delete them

    Because if TMR allowed such behaviour to continue they could be in breach of the Telecommunications Act not to mention be subject to prosecution should someone take the offensive comments personally etc. - Good job guys
  • Klaus says,
    5 years ago
    2 likes
    Hi guys,

    I am picking up a GXL Troop carrier this Friday, spending about $22,000 ($93,000 in total) at ARB decking it out & planning a trip to Cape York & north west WA in June.I'd rather have a 78 series than a similar priced Range Rover Sport.
    I will let you fellas know how she performs when i come back in September.

    Klaus.
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    Sounds Sweet Klaus,
    What are you gonna be decking it out with at ARB??
  • Klaus says,
    5 years ago
    2 likes
    Tomas79,

    Twin diff locks, bull bar with 12,000lb Warn winch, full length side steps with brush bars, twin wheel carrier, dual batteries, overhead console with UHF & HF radios, double height draws in the back 1900mm in length, second set of BF Goodrich mud terrain KM2 tyres with sunraysia wheels, 3 inch Old Man Emu lift, cargo barrier, two 900xs HID spot lights, diff breathers.
    Also a $25,000 camper trailer with a 60 litre Engel fridge / freezer, 80 litre Waeco fridge, twin batteries connected to the front two batteries via a Anderson plug, stainless steel sink, 130 litre water tank, twin gas bottles & three jerry cans.
    I think thats it !!!
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    Sounds Awesome Klaus!!

    I'll be going the KM2s also, once my current set of Cooper STT's run out!!
  • Klaus says,
    5 years ago
    Tomas79,

    I considered the STT's but with my experience with BFG all terrains I decided to stay loyal. Even though I haven't driven Cooper or Goodyear Wrangler, they seem to be the same.

    Reading through all the comments so far it seems that everyone is complaining about the price. I have been looking in the touring 4WD market for about 18 months & found nothing really as consistent as the Troopy. When they decided to move up to a V8, they sold me, but without having an airbag was a bad move due to all the mine sites around Australia required OH&S in vehicles & Toyota was loosing to the Nissan Patrol. They changed this back to an air bag in June 2009.
    The other issue is the front axle, it is about 45mm wider than the rear so it can hold the V8. Toyota are still using the old rear axle from earlier 70 series,,,, a bit lazy !!!
  • Tomas79 says,
    5 years ago
    Klaus,

    Yeah, I'm keen to try the km2 too, as at the moment i'm not too happy with the cooper's, as they don't handle so well.
    I used to have the softer Goodyear MT/r, which actually were significantly more noisier, and wore out pretty quickly, but they were soft and seemed to handle better...

    Once you come back from the trip, let us know how the km2's go...

    I reckon the price for this Toyota is fair, given it's a fair bit of metal, and it's all still made in Japan.
    And since you can't get any other twin solid axle, v8 truck in this country, the price can be easily dictated by forces of supply/demand!!

    Rip off are what people pay for BMW x3.x5 x6 softroaders!!

    Sure LC76 could be cheaper but Toyota is a business after all, and not some charity organisation!!
  • Bavarian Missile says,
    5 years ago
    This is a commercial vehicle , and shouldn't really be compared to a BMW x3.x5 x6. They arent designed for what this is,commercial work,simple.

    Still out of dated it in its styling and over priced .........................Mr Mark you were right on "The Mark" 80 series was the last of the great Cruisers...............

    Ive owned a couple but after test driving the 100 series when it first came out lost interest in the Toyota product,drove like a ferry.Heard they got worse with the 200.

    A good mate that owns a 4x4 workshop said the same. Hes a serious off roader and mud runner racer ,sorry no Toyota engines in them for him .
    • blockdoc says,
      2 years ago
      ref -to land rover devender.
      had a mate who was in army using troop carriers and defenders for 30 years and told me the problem with defenders was they were prone to rolling and in a lot of cases killing people.
      said they were to light and all had to be fitted with roll cages.
      I thought it wold be other way round but not so.
      After 30 years in army spending up to a month at a time trekking thought parts of outback with up to 8 troopy,s in tow.[changing up to 50 split rims during trek]
      he and his best mate retired and went out and bought an old troopy ,striped it and rebuilt all the way back and set about planning a long adventure in outback australia to continue the adventures.
      i asks why a troopy and he said because there is no vehicle as reliable and tough as the cruiser ,ask anyone who,s used them who been in the army????????????
  • MRMARK says,
    5 years ago
    Yeah I am not a fan of the new 200 series as its to low,to heavy and sits on all independent suspension making it nothing more than a huge fat softroader now. Its a real shame. I have never seen one out on the tracks but seen a few on the beach getting bogged but that's more to do with the people driving them not having any clue on how to drive on the beach. I think the patrol is also going the same way as the 200 series with the next all new model so its going to be hard to find suitable replacements when the day comes to trade in the old girl.
  • Gerard says,
    5 years ago
    2 likes
    We have run Toyotas for last 30 years and had aussie ones mixed in there but the Toyota come out in front.They are a work horse on our farms and dearer to buy but costs are minimal. Some of our vehicles do 300000ks or more and locals buy them off us and keep going. Have 200 series with 90000 and hilux with 300000 and only days away from 70 series GXL with trimmings to face the storm,I know they they are more expensive but they are reliable and just suit our businesses. It gives me the crap when some people pick your brains about our choices and make others and see their crap choices and endless repairs Cheers Gerry
  • zoltan85 says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    80 series last of the great cruisers???? All the 70 series except that bunderra come prado thing are the best.
    if it wasnt for the woman i wouldnt own a 200 (but its a great car)
    But its garage mate the FJ73 (0000217) (560,000kms)is still the best 4wd.
    load the roofrack while you stand on the bonnet make life easy.
    try doing that with your ***y prado or 60/80/100/200 or patrol or Fseries or Hummer h3 etc. love the looks in the camp ground when the bonnet doesnt dent . 1mm Steel costs money .70 series a mans machine,
    .
    when the going gets tough the 70s get going.
  • Jeremy says,
    5 years ago
    MRMARKS comments about all independednt suspension is incorrect on a 200 series. All models in the 200 series range have a live axel on rear, independent on front. Like the 200 the 70 series is overpriced, but the demand is there, so why would toyota reduce the price when the current waiting list is up to 12 months for private buyers? When I have the $$$ I will hapilly trade in my 100 series for one of these. Probably go for the 70 series because of its no frills ruggedness, but would love the 200 for its twin turbo diesel.......... Eitherway I would be happy
  • Kurt Alexander says,
    5 years ago
    I have recently purchased a 2010 GXL station Wagon made for me in Japan (lol) with twin diff lockers, steel winch Bar and winch, air con, tow bar, alarm, cruise control, dual batteries...$81 000! Done 3000 km already in less than 2 weeks.

    My '99 Disco S2 V8 on gas is in need of work...a constant refrain with Land Rovers. Getting someone else to do the work at a fair price to keep it as my work vehicle meant $10000 immediately. I can do it for half that...needed a second vehicle and went for Toyota reliability....bad decision comfort wise.

    I have owned 2 early 2 door Range Rovers on Gas, 2 SWB LR's, a LWB LR, Disco 1 V8 on gas, briefly an old Patrol and a slant 4 cyl International Scout which got stolen. I have driven extensively in Rodeo's, in Hilux's, FJ40's and some ford F series and a little in some Pajero's. All are capable 4WD's, simple outside means less to fall off when it gets rough so the 70's series is the better in this respect at least.

    The bottom line is the 70's series is grossly over priced, uncomfortable, very poorly fitted out, extremely noisy, in all a pr@^* of a thing compared to the Disco 2. It will serve me reliably in the country and deep in the wild and I expect to keep it a fair few years unless an auto comes out soon.

    For the mechanically minded, the Disco 2 V8 or Disco 1 TDi (2nd hand) is a great vehicle. Not as comfortable as a Pajero in the rough as its wheel base causes a bit of bouncing but it is as capable as any driven well. Auto, oh sweet auto. The 70 series gearing is ridiculous, needs a 6th gear...anyone know if an over drive unit can be put on such a vehicle?

    Somehow this argument about a work vehicle needing to be rough and Spartan is a bit beyond me. Why? Why should a work vehicle in which one spends many hours a day driving in all terrains but, like most 4WD owners, mostly on the road, be uncomfortable and fitted out as a cost saving exercise than with consideration?

    Toyota have become incredibly arrogant and cheap. The D4D badges are decals now, the speakers embarrassing, the interior fitment really poor, the seats really uncomfortable, the insulation per noise levels legally questionable given the dB's and constant ringing ears. The engine revs far too high on the road, the economy is compromised as soon as one goes over 105 kmh!

    Decent seats, a twin turbo, a 200 series auto and reasonable insulation for noise only would see this vehicle as the greatest 4WD available. Instead it's an over priced, hard to get slave. Just like the old twin tub washing machine...good wash, cheap, simple, but a demanding machine to use.

    I should have got another 2 disco 2's or a debugged disco 3 and had oodles to spare.

    So in conclusion, what price reliability?!!!! Grow up Toyota! Arrogant...just travel to a place like Thailand and see all the older 1990's Hilux's etc running around with the D4D badge and you soon realize how Toyota have been playing us! New common rail bulldust! Its been around for years but we were only good enough to get the economy, power and efficiency of it since 2007!
  • mickjd says,
    5 years ago
    I work out of my 76 wagom .Yep totally agree on needing a 6 speed. I put 33inch tyres on and made it beter.Like some one else said i purchased this verical because i love 4wd and camping with my kids.This car in 4wd low with the gearing is as sure footed as a mountain goat.As for the 100 and 80 series i have to go last down hills because they catch up and i have to excelerate because there going as slow as they can. On frazer i was in 5th gear on the soft stuff and my mates 4.2 turbo nissan was in 3rd reving hard and close to over heating, mine never went over half way. I think the nissan 4.2 has a better drive train because every thing is under neath the rails.But my mate said if nissan dont continue to make a live axle he will buy one. In the bush the extra low down grunt is brilliant as i said before down shale an big steps u have to excelerate to go down hill. Price yep it would be nice if they were cheaper but u find a tougher balls and all grunt 4wd with front live axles in it.Before i purchased the 76 wagon i had my heart set on a 130 defender, i loved the 4doors and tray for work brilliant. I then drove one( td5i) my god im 5.8 height ,i felt like i was back in school sitting at a desk ,the steering wheel wasnt in the centre and my arm was pushed against the door. it was like driving a tractor i was pissed off i really liked the tuff look of them and still do but own and drive one to work no way. The 80 series guy you have a point on every thing you said even still drive one of these v8 s in low range they are brilliant. I purchased this car because i wanted a hard 4wd that i could work out of. I carry about 400 to 450 kg all the time some times more. Im a bit of a lead foot and around town in sydney traffic i get 620ks for around about 80 to 82 ltrs. Thats driving agressive. on the hwy with 33inch tyres 110 its not great but its ok better at 100 like the other guy said. For what i wanted its a great all rounder. And working with barn doors is so much better on my back . get rid of tail gates or bring back the dual one like ford used to have. Mt walker in lithgow standard tyres no lift arb rear diff lock ,pritty rugged climb ,pissed it in went up as well if not easier than my mates nissen that has 2 diff locks 4inch lift and 33inch tyres. He was impressed how well it went in stock form.
  • 4x4 says,
    4 years ago
    smile
  • 4x4 says,
    4 years ago
    70 series its a better car when i compare which any 4wd,,bcoz it was born not make spoilled,its heavy n strong to struggle as long way. .thats why hw much any goverment using this car as a military car
  • says,
    4 years ago
    Lol, Well most of these 4wds are actually used offroad!!

    Wheelnut, have you actually got verifiable numbers of the vehicles used??

    Also the wast majority of used in mining industry are toyota's, anything else is only considered when the waiting list just gets too great... I have even seen mining companies even go looking for good condition second hand toyota's once the waiting list was too long... ..

    sorry bout the lateness of this comment, in refards to this comment i can tell you that you're absolutely right, i work as a contractor in the mining industry in karratha and my work car as well as the majority of the rest of the mining industry in this country all prefer toyotas.

    take this advice from someone who see's it firsthand everyday. the majority of vehicles used away from any city are toyotas (and nissans a bit too, sorry to tojo lovers)
  • Saids says,
    3 years ago
    Does anyone know the paint code for the grey bumper colour on these vehicles???
  • Aku Matialu says,
    3 years ago
    Could you please give the price for this vehicle?

    Thanks
    Aku
  • Alphonce says,
    3 years ago
    My favorite type of 4x4 but too expensive, please lower the price.
  • Martin says,
    3 years ago
    1 like
    PLEASE, Mr. TOYOTA, bring this car to EUROPE smile

    Martin, Czech Republic

  • leslie anne cappelletto says,
    2 years ago
    1 like
    biggrinSeriously, if you want a town car, buy a sedan. Quick it can be, but they are not a race car, again buy a town car or a hsv ute if you want street grunt. This vehicle is work horse. Nothing pretty. I bought mine to tow the 3 horse float, and all the gear I carry in that, the vehicle just loves to pull. Carts the work gear and trailer. It's mine, a ladies horse float dream, plenty of clearance and plenty of power!! I do wish it had a better stereo. I love my TOJO, it is my 3rd one,and I will not be parting with it any time soon.
  • JD says,
    2 years ago
    The mining topic you bring up is very interesting.
    I understand most of those comments were made some time ago but we have seen a shift with some of the biggest mining companies with some huge orders for the all new Ford Ranger. One mining company has ordered in excess of 2000 new Rangers for Western Australia alone, which has seen a massive supply issue for the general public. Seems that the 5 star safety rating of the Ranger will far outweigh the "tough reliable workhorse" status of the Landcruiser...

    This also makes me wonder how the recent Landcruiser Sales in Australia actualy compare with the rest of the world? Are we really that significant? Will Toyota do anything with the Hilux and/or Landcrusier with the massive and ever increasing shift in the Australian mining industry toward's "safety" and produce something to compete with these new 5 star 4x4's? Is the mining industry as important as WE might think?



  • Sub says,
    2 years ago
    I happen to find this post after finding myself in the market for a 4x4, my old Holden Jackaroo after 5 years has meet its maker, with a blown engine. I have been deliberating between a 2010 Nissan Patrol turbo diesel or a 2010 series 70 troppy. However I find myself confused, reading through all the comments.. I guess the best way is to get out and give them both a decent test drive..my only concern is the comfort of the troopy..also I get off-road every couple of months. Any suggestions
    • goanna says,
      1 year ago
      Ignore the comments.
      The seats have improved, now has ABS, Diff Locks standard and a 130l fuel tank standard.

      Plus airbags.
      got mine brand new for $63000 drive away no more to pay.
  • Carl says,
    1 year ago
    Just bought a 2010 76 Series Wagon Workmate upgrade ex miner. Passed every mechanical inspection I could throw at it just to make sure I would have no issues while under the Dealer Warranty and so took it into the tough offroad terrain outside Merredin in Wa and it just ate everything I pointed it at. Towed a fully laden trailer for 1000k round trip, what trailer smile Workmate has no fancy bull*** and does what I expect it to ... Go anywhere, tow anything and bring me home. Those who complain about this vehicle better rush off and buy a Sahara you bunch of soft C#%$ because this is a serious off roader and pretends to be nothing else!!! Love my 76 series
    • Nathan says,
      11 months ago
      great car i love mine seats r fine power is awesome all-round love itbiggrinbiggrinbiggrin
      • Cjay says,
        10 months ago
        Just racked up 10,000 k's now on my workmate 76 series. Absolutely love it. Not a problem. Best car iv ever driven. If you enjoy remote travel and off roading Buy One.biggrin
  • Peter says,
    10 months ago
    can anyone tell me how many tow points are on these vehicles at the front?

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