Mike Stevens | Nov 25, 2009 | 52 Comments

FOLLOWING ITS UNVEILING in September, Toyota Australia has now launched the fourth-generation 150 Series Toyota Prado.

Available in five and three-door bodystyles with a total of fourteen variants, Toyota expects the new Prado to take the brand beyond 150,000 Australian sales for 2009.

 

Styling

Slightly larger than the outgoing model, the new Prado is 80mm longer, 10mm wider and 15mm lower. This gives it a wider stance, although it still looks a little tippy-toes on tarmac, especially the three door.

According to Toyota, the changes to the new Prado's styling and lower overall height improve aerodynamics, cutting the new model's drag coefficient from 0.37Cd to 0.35.

With a new LandCruiser 200 Series-inspired "three-dimensional" grille and angular healights, Toyota's intent was to create a wide, distinctive and recognisable countenance. We can't yet decide our view; it is certainly unmistakeable, but some may find the lines challenging.

A higher beltline dominates the Prado's profile on both the five and three-door bodystyles, while sharply-styled bumpers highlight the short overhangs front and rear.

LED lights feature in the Prado's integrated door mirror indicators and tail-lights, and a body-coloured rear spoiler houses the rear-window wiper and LED centre high-mounted stop lamp.

 

Interior

Following a design theme Toyota describes as "Intelligent Modern", the new Prado's interior combines strong horizontal and vertical lines for a 'rugged' contemporary feel. There is something a bit Land Rover-ish about the design elements here.

The instrument cluster features a pair of stylish cylindrical meters. Prado GX, GXL and SX have back-lit meters, while the VX, Kakadu and ZR trims offer more vibrant vacuum-fluorescent Optitron meters.

A four-spoke steering wheel with steering-mounted controls is standard across the range. GXL, VX and SX models get audio and telephone controls, while the Kakadu and ZR trims get multi-information and camera controls.

Protruding through the centre of the dash, the upper instrument panel and centre-stack adds a refined utilitarian look, while interior spot-lighting has been designed to provide a comfortable and appealing ambience.

Larger apertures feature in the front and rear doors, and multiple grab handles offer easier entry and exit.

The new Prado five-door features a sliding second-row seat, while the third-row seat folds flat rather than against the side windows, offering improved storage space.

 

Interior

The 2010 Prado features a range of Driver Assist Technology systems (DAT), including Active Traction Control and Vehicle Stability Control on all models.

Other DAT systems include constant four-wheel drive and ABS ant-skid brakes, featuring Electronic Brakeforce Distribution and Brake Assist.

Hill-start Active Control (to prevent rolling backwards), Downhill Active Control (reducing drive input when descending steep inclines) and Toyota’s CRAWL system - currently standard fitment on the larger LandCruiser 200 Series - also feature on the new model.

Designed to assist drivers navigating tricky terrain, CRAWL is a 'feet-off' control system that operates in low-range and replaces Downhill Assist Control.

The system has been designed to minimise wheel spin and lock on rocky and sandy tracks, also making itself useful in escaping mud traps.

Seven airbags are fitted as standard, including two-stage driver's airbag, driver's knee airbag, front-passenger front airbag, front-seat side airbags and side curtain-shield airbags.

Front-seat head restraints are standard, improving occupant protection in a rear-end collision.

Featuring rear camera views, outside air temperature and trip information, Prado GXL, VX, SX, Kakadu and ZR models get a 4.3-inch display in the instrument cluster.

Trip information includes cruising range, average fuel consumption, instantaneous fuel consumption, fuel consumption since refuelling, average speed and total run time.

On VX, Kakadu and ZR models, owners can tailor vehicle functions, such as door unlock sequence, lights-off timing and auto headlamps-on level.

Three-zone climate-control air-conditioning is featured in GXL, VX and Kakadu specs, offering separate controls for both front occupants and controls for rear-seat passengers.

Three-door SX and ZR models have dual-zone air-conditioning, with separate controls for the driver and front passenge. The entry-level GX offers push-button single-zone manual air-conditioning as standard.

Four audio systems are available across the Prado range, each offering iPod, Bluetooth, USB and Aux connectivity.

Prado GX, GXL and SX models offer a six-speaker audio system with AM/FM radio and CD player. The VX howvever comes with a nine-speaker audio system, including a six-disc CD multi-changer. Kakadu, SX, ZR, GXL and VX models feature steering-mounted audio controls.

The three-door ZR and the Kakadu five-door both offer a premium Pioneer audio system with DVD-based satellite navigation. The range-topping Kakadu also offers rear-seat DVD entertainment as standard equipment.

 

Mechanical Package

There are two engines on offer for new Prado; one petrol and one diesel.

Producing 202kW at 5600rpm and 381Nm of torque at 4400pm (with 310Nm available from 1200rpm), the 4.0 litre V6 petrol engine can be paired with a six-speed manual or a five-speed automatic transmission with sequential shifting.

Fuel economy has been improved by 12 percent on the five-door petrol automatic, listing a fuel consumption figure of 11.5 l/100km, while the petrol manual lists a figure of 13.0 l/100km.

The Prado's 3.0 litre turbo-diesel, standard in the three-door bodystyle and the five-door GX, gets new injectors and a front-mounted intercooler.

Producing 127kW at 3400rpm and 410Nm between 1600 to 2800rpm, the turbo-diesel engine lists a fuel consumption figure of 8.5 l/100km in automatic guise, and 8.8 l/100km when paired with the manual transmission.

The three-door automatic turbo-diesel lists a fuel economy of 8.3 l/100km.

Both the six-speed manual and five-speed automatic transmissions are matched to a full-time four-wheel-drive system with a lockable Torsen centre differential and two-speed transfer.

For smoother shifting, the six-speed manual features a triple-cone synchromesh on first, second and third gears. The manual transmission is available on five-door GX and GXL model grades only.

Replacing the conventional transfer lever, the new Prado has a dial to control the high/low transfer settings.

Down below, the Prado's front double-wishbone suspension has been designed to enhance straight-line and braking stability and to reduce roll-steer, automatically adjusting the front and rear anti-roll bars to suit driving conditions.

Long-travel five-link rear suspension features at the rear, and Toyota says a balance of optimum roll-stiffness, a low roll-centre and low roll-steer has been achieved.

According to Toyota, the new Prado was designed to "drive like a sports car" on the road. While it may be more than a little wide of that claim, as our 'first drive' proved, the new Prado's refined suspension is as capable on-road as off it.

The five-door VX and Kakadu models get Toyota's Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System, which first appeared on the LandCruiser 200 Series.

In short, the KDSS system provides maximum wheel articulation off-road, and a comfortable 'flat' ride on-road.

For braking, the new Prado features four-piston brake callipers up front, while the front ventilated rotors have been increased in thickness from 28mm to 32mm, leading to a 14 percent increase in heat capacity.

 

Pricing

5-door wagon
5-door wagon $55,990^
GXL petrol manual $60,990^
GXL turbo-diesel manual $61,990^
VX petrol auto $74,490
VX turbo-diesel auto $75,490
Kakadu petrol auto $87,990
Kakadu turbo-diesel auto $88,990
3-door
SX turbo-diesel auto $55,990
ZR turbo-diesel auto $65,990
Advanced safety pack (Kakadu, ZR) $2,500
Seven-seat option (GX) $2,500

^Add $2500 for automatic transmission.

Styling

Slightly larger than the outgoing model, the new Prado is 80mm longer, 10mm wider and 15mm lower. This gives it a wider stance, although it still looks a little tippy-toes on tarmac, especially the three door.

According to Toyota, the changes to the new Prado's styling and lower overall height improve aerodynamics, cutting the new model's drag coefficient from 0.37Cd to 0.35.

With a new LandCruiser 200 Series-inspired "three-dimensional" grille and angular healights, Toyota's intent was to create a wide, distinctive and recognisable countenance. We can't yet decide our view; it is certainly unmistakeable, but some may find the lines challenging.

A higher beltline dominates the Prado's profile on both the five and three-door bodystyles, while sharply-styled bumpers highlight the short overhangs front and rear.

LED lights feature in the Prado's integrated door mirror indicators and tail-lights, and a body-coloured rear spoiler houses the rear-window wiper and LED centre high-mounted stop lamp.

Interior

Following a design theme Toyota describes as "Intelligent Modern", the new Prado's interior combines strong horizontal and vertical lines for a 'rugged' contemporary feel. There is something a bit Land Rover-ish about the design elements here.

The instrument cluster features a pair of stylish cylindrical meters. Prado GX, GXL and SX have back-lit meters, while the VX, Kakadu and ZR trims offer more vibrant vacuum-fluorescent Optitron meters.

A four-spoke steering wheel with steering-mounted controls is standard across the range. GXL, VX and SX models get audio and telephone controls, while the Kakadu and ZR trims get multi-information and camera controls.

Protruding through the centre of the dash, the upper instrument panel and centre-stack adds a refined utilitarian look, while interior spot-lighting has been designed to provide a comfortable and appealing ambience.

Larger apertures feature in the front and rear doors, and multiple grab handles offer easier entry and exit.

The new Prado five-door features a sliding second-row seat, while the third-row seat folds flat rather than against the side windows, offering improved storage space.

Equipment

The 2010 Prado features a range of Driver Assist Technology systems (DAT), including Active Traction Control and Vehicle Stability Control on all models.

Other DAT systems include constant four-wheel drive and ABS ant-skid brakes, featuring Electronic Brakeforce Distribution and Brake Assist.

Hill-start Active Control (to prevent rolling backwards), Downhill Active Control (reducing drive input when descending steep inclines) and Toyota’s CRAWL system - currently standard fitment on the larger LandCruiser 200 Series - also feature on the new model.

Designed to assist drivers navigating tricky terrain, CRAWL is a 'feet-off' control system that operates in low-range and replaces Downhill Assist Control.

The system has been designed to minimise wheel spin and lock on rocky and sandy tracks, also making itself useful in escaping mud traps.

Seven airbags are fitted as standard, including two-stage driver's airbag, driver's knee airbag, front-passenger front airbag, front-seat side airbags and side curtain-shield airbags.

Front-seat head restraints are standard, improving occupant protection in a rear-end collision.

Featuring rear camera views, outside air temperature and trip information, Prado GXL, VX, SX, Kakadu and ZR models get a 4.3-inch display in the instrument cluster.

Trip information includes cruising range, average fuel consumption, instantaneous fuel consumption, fuel consumption since refuelling, average speed and total run time.

On VX, Kakadu and ZR models, owners can tailor vehicle functions, such as door unlock sequence, lights-off timing and auto headlamps-on level.

Three-zone climate-control air-conditioning is featured in GXL, VX and Kakadu specs, offering separate controls for both front occupants and controls for rear-seat passengers.

Three-door SX and ZR models have dual-zone air-conditioning, with separate controls for the driver and front passenge. The entry-level GX offers push-button single-zone manual air-conditioning as standard.

Four audio systems are available across the Prado range, each offering iPod, Bluetooth, USB and Aux connectivity.

Prado GX, GXL and SX models offer a six-speaker audio system with AM/FM radio and CD player. The VX howvever comes with a nine-speaker audio system, including a six-disc CD multi-changer. Kakadu, SX, ZR, GXL and VX models feature steering-mounted audio controls.

The three-door ZR and the Kakadu five-door both offer a premium Pioneer audio system with DVD-based satellite navigation. The range-topping Kakadu also offers rear-seat DVD entertainment as standard equipment.

Mechanical

There are two engines on offer for new Prado; one petrol and one diesel.

Producing 202kW at 5600rpm and 381Nm of torque at 4400pm (with 310Nm available from 1200rpm), the 4.0 litre V6 petrol engine can be paired with a six-speed manual or a five-speed automatic transmission with sequential shifting.

Fuel economy has been improved by 12 percent on the five-door petrol automatic, listing a fuel consumption figure of 11.5 l/100km, while the petrol manual lists a figure of 13.0 l/100km.

The Prado's 3.0 litre turbo-diesel, standard in the three-door bodystyle and the five-door GX, gets new injectors and a front-mounted intercooler.

Producing 127kW at 3400rpm and 410Nm between 1600 to 2800rpm, the turbo-diesel engine lists a fuel consumption figure of 8.5 l/100km in automatic guise, and 8.8 l/100km when paired with the manual transmission.

The three-door automatic turbo-diesel lists a fuel economy of 8.3 l/100km.

Both the six-speed manual and five-speed automatic transmissions are matched to a full-time four-wheel-drive system with a lockable Torsen centre differential and two-speed transfer.

For smoother shifting, the six-speed manual features a triple-cone synchromesh on first, second and third gears. The manual transmission is available on five-door GX and GXL model grades only.

Replacing the conventional transfer lever, the new Prado has a dial to control the high/low transfer settings.

Down below, the Prado's front double-wishbone suspension has been designed to enhance straight-line and braking stability and to reduce roll-steer, automatically adjusting the front and rear anti-roll bars to suit driving conditions.

Long-travel five-link rear suspension features at the rear, and Toyota says a balance of optimum roll-stiffness, a low roll-centre and low roll-steer has been achieved.

According to Toyota, the new Prado was designed to "drive like a sports car" on the road. While it may be more than a little wide of that claim, as our 'first drive' proved, the new Prado's refined suspension is as capable on-road as off it.

The five-door VX and Kakadu models get Toyota's Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System, which first appeared on the LandCruiser 200 Series.

In short, the KDSS system provides maximum wheel articulation off-road, and a comfortable 'flat' ride on-road.

For braking, the new Prado features four-piston brake callipers up front, while the front ventilated rotors have been increased in thickness from 28mm to 32mm, leading to a 14 percent increase in heat capacity.

Pricing

Pricing

5-door wagon
5-door wagon $55,990^
GXL petrol manual $60,990^
GXL turbo-diesel manual $61,990^
VX petrol auto $74,490
VX turbo-diesel auto $75,490
Kakadu petrol auto $87,990
Kakadu turbo-diesel auto $88,990
3-door
SX turbo-diesel auto $55,990
ZR turbo-diesel auto $65,990
Advanced safety pack (Kakadu, ZR) $2,500
Seven-seat option (GX) $2,500

^Add $2500 for automatic transmission.

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