2010 Toyota Prado Launch

Mike Stevens | 51 Comments

FOLLOWING ITS UNVEILING in September, Toyota Australia has now launched the fourth-generation 150 Series Toyota Prado.

Available in five and three-door bodystyles with a total of fourteen variants, Toyota expects the new Prado to take the brand beyond 150,000 Australian sales for 2009.

Styling

Slightly larger than the outgoing model, the new Prado is 80mm longer, 10mm wider and 15mm lower. This gives it a wider stance, although it still looks a little tippy-toes on tarmac, especially the three door.

According to Toyota, the changes to the new Prado's styling and lower overall height improve aerodynamics, cutting the new model's drag coefficient from 0.37Cd to 0.35.

With a new LandCruiser 200 Series-inspired "three-dimensional" grille and angular healights, Toyota's intent was to create a wide, distinctive and recognisable countenance. We can't yet decide our view; it is certainly unmistakeable, but some may find the lines challenging.

A higher beltline dominates the Prado's profile on both the five and three-door bodystyles, while sharply-styled bumpers highlight the short overhangs front and rear.

LED lights feature in the Prado's integrated door mirror indicators and tail-lights, and a body-coloured rear spoiler houses the rear-window wiper and LED centre high-mounted stop lamp.

Interior

Following a design theme Toyota describes as "Intelligent Modern", the new Prado's interior combines strong horizontal and vertical lines for a 'rugged' contemporary feel. There is something a bit Land Rover-ish about the design elements here.

The instrument cluster features a pair of stylish cylindrical meters. Prado GX, GXL and SX have back-lit meters, while the VX, Kakadu and ZR trims offer more vibrant vacuum-fluorescent Optitron meters.

A four-spoke steering wheel with steering-mounted controls is standard across the range. GXL, VX and SX models get audio and telephone controls, while the Kakadu and ZR trims get multi-information and camera controls.

Protruding through the centre of the dash, the upper instrument panel and centre-stack adds a refined utilitarian look, while interior spot-lighting has been designed to provide a comfortable and appealing ambience.

Larger apertures feature in the front and rear doors, and multiple grab handles offer easier entry and exit.

The new Prado five-door features a sliding second-row seat, while the third-row seat folds flat rather than against the side windows, offering improved storage space.

Interior

The 2010 Prado features a range of Driver Assist Technology systems (DAT), including Active Traction Control and Vehicle Stability Control on all models.

Other DAT systems include constant four-wheel drive and ABS ant-skid brakes, featuring Electronic Brakeforce Distribution and Brake Assist.

Hill-start Active Control (to prevent rolling backwards), Downhill Active Control (reducing drive input when descending steep inclines) and Toyota’s CRAWL system - currently standard fitment on the larger LandCruiser 200 Series - also feature on the new model.

Designed to assist drivers navigating tricky terrain, CRAWL is a 'feet-off' control system that operates in low-range and replaces Downhill Assist Control.

The system has been designed to minimise wheel spin and lock on rocky and sandy tracks, also making itself useful in escaping mud traps.

Seven airbags are fitted as standard, including two-stage driver's airbag, driver's knee airbag, front-passenger front airbag, front-seat side airbags and side curtain-shield airbags.

Front-seat head restraints are standard, improving occupant protection in a rear-end collision.

Featuring rear camera views, outside air temperature and trip information, Prado GXL, VX, SX, Kakadu and ZR models get a 4.3-inch display in the instrument cluster.

Trip information includes cruising range, average fuel consumption, instantaneous fuel consumption, fuel consumption since refuelling, average speed and total run time.

On VX, Kakadu and ZR models, owners can tailor vehicle functions, such as door unlock sequence, lights-off timing and auto headlamps-on level.

Three-zone climate-control air-conditioning is featured in GXL, VX and Kakadu specs, offering separate controls for both front occupants and controls for rear-seat passengers.

Three-door SX and ZR models have dual-zone air-conditioning, with separate controls for the driver and front passenge. The entry-level GX offers push-button single-zone manual air-conditioning as standard.

Four audio systems are available across the Prado range, each offering iPod, Bluetooth, USB and Aux connectivity.

Prado GX, GXL and SX models offer a six-speaker audio system with AM/FM radio and CD player. The VX howvever comes with a nine-speaker audio system, including a six-disc CD multi-changer. Kakadu, SX, ZR, GXL and VX models feature steering-mounted audio controls.

The three-door ZR and the Kakadu five-door both offer a premium Pioneer audio system with DVD-based satellite navigation. The range-topping Kakadu also offers rear-seat DVD entertainment as standard equipment.

Mechanical Package

There are two engines on offer for new Prado; one petrol and one diesel.

Producing 202kW at 5600rpm and 381Nm of torque at 4400pm (with 310Nm available from 1200rpm), the 4.0 litre V6 petrol engine can be paired with a six-speed manual or a five-speed automatic transmission with sequential shifting.

Fuel economy has been improved by 12 percent on the five-door petrol automatic, listing a fuel consumption figure of 11.5 l/100km, while the petrol manual lists a figure of 13.0 l/100km.

The Prado's 3.0 litre turbo-diesel, standard in the three-door bodystyle and the five-door GX, gets new injectors and a front-mounted intercooler.

Producing 127kW at 3400rpm and 410Nm between 1600 to 2800rpm, the turbo-diesel engine lists a fuel consumption figure of 8.5 l/100km in automatic guise, and 8.8 l/100km when paired with the manual transmission.

The three-door automatic turbo-diesel lists a fuel economy of 8.3 l/100km.

Both the six-speed manual and five-speed automatic transmissions are matched to a full-time four-wheel-drive system with a lockable Torsen centre differential and two-speed transfer.

For smoother shifting, the six-speed manual features a triple-cone synchromesh on first, second and third gears. The manual transmission is available on five-door GX and GXL model grades only.

Replacing the conventional transfer lever, the new Prado has a dial to control the high/low transfer settings.

Down below, the Prado's front double-wishbone suspension has been designed to enhance straight-line and braking stability and to reduce roll-steer, automatically adjusting the front and rear anti-roll bars to suit driving conditions.

Long-travel five-link rear suspension features at the rear, and Toyota says a balance of optimum roll-stiffness, a low roll-centre and low roll-steer has been achieved.

According to Toyota, the new Prado was designed to "drive like a sports car" on the road. While it may be more than a little wide of that claim, as our 'first drive' proved, the new Prado's refined suspension is as capable on-road as off it.

The five-door VX and Kakadu models get Toyota's Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System, which first appeared on the LandCruiser 200 Series.

In short, the KDSS system provides maximum wheel articulation off-road, and a comfortable 'flat' ride on-road.

For braking, the new Prado features four-piston brake callipers up front, while the front ventilated rotors have been increased in thickness from 28mm to 32mm, leading to a 14 percent increase in heat capacity.

Pricing

5-door wagon
5-door wagon $55,990^
GXL petrol manual $60,990^
GXL turbo-diesel manual $61,990^
VX petrol auto $74,490
VX turbo-diesel auto $75,490
Kakadu petrol auto $87,990
Kakadu turbo-diesel auto $88,990
3-door
SX turbo-diesel auto $55,990
ZR turbo-diesel auto $65,990
Advanced safety pack (Kakadu, ZR) $2,500
Seven-seat option (GX) $2,500

^Add $2500 for automatic transmission.

Styling

Slightly larger than the outgoing model, the new Prado is 80mm longer, 10mm wider and 15mm lower. This gives it a wider stance, although it still looks a little tippy-toes on tarmac, especially the three door.

According to Toyota, the changes to the new Prado's styling and lower overall height improve aerodynamics, cutting the new model's drag coefficient from 0.37Cd to 0.35.

With a new LandCruiser 200 Series-inspired "three-dimensional" grille and angular healights, Toyota's intent was to create a wide, distinctive and recognisable countenance. We can't yet decide our view; it is certainly unmistakeable, but some may find the lines challenging.

A higher beltline dominates the Prado's profile on both the five and three-door bodystyles, while sharply-styled bumpers highlight the short overhangs front and rear.

LED lights feature in the Prado's integrated door mirror indicators and tail-lights, and a body-coloured rear spoiler houses the rear-window wiper and LED centre high-mounted stop lamp.

Interior

Following a design theme Toyota describes as "Intelligent Modern", the new Prado's interior combines strong horizontal and vertical lines for a 'rugged' contemporary feel. There is something a bit Land Rover-ish about the design elements here.

The instrument cluster features a pair of stylish cylindrical meters. Prado GX, GXL and SX have back-lit meters, while the VX, Kakadu and ZR trims offer more vibrant vacuum-fluorescent Optitron meters.

A four-spoke steering wheel with steering-mounted controls is standard across the range. GXL, VX and SX models get audio and telephone controls, while the Kakadu and ZR trims get multi-information and camera controls.

Protruding through the centre of the dash, the upper instrument panel and centre-stack adds a refined utilitarian look, while interior spot-lighting has been designed to provide a comfortable and appealing ambience.

Larger apertures feature in the front and rear doors, and multiple grab handles offer easier entry and exit.

The new Prado five-door features a sliding second-row seat, while the third-row seat folds flat rather than against the side windows, offering improved storage space.

Equipment

The 2010 Prado features a range of Driver Assist Technology systems (DAT), including Active Traction Control and Vehicle Stability Control on all models.

Other DAT systems include constant four-wheel drive and ABS ant-skid brakes, featuring Electronic Brakeforce Distribution and Brake Assist.

Hill-start Active Control (to prevent rolling backwards), Downhill Active Control (reducing drive input when descending steep inclines) and Toyota’s CRAWL system - currently standard fitment on the larger LandCruiser 200 Series - also feature on the new model.

Designed to assist drivers navigating tricky terrain, CRAWL is a 'feet-off' control system that operates in low-range and replaces Downhill Assist Control.

The system has been designed to minimise wheel spin and lock on rocky and sandy tracks, also making itself useful in escaping mud traps.

Seven airbags are fitted as standard, including two-stage driver's airbag, driver's knee airbag, front-passenger front airbag, front-seat side airbags and side curtain-shield airbags.

Front-seat head restraints are standard, improving occupant protection in a rear-end collision.

Featuring rear camera views, outside air temperature and trip information, Prado GXL, VX, SX, Kakadu and ZR models get a 4.3-inch display in the instrument cluster.

Trip information includes cruising range, average fuel consumption, instantaneous fuel consumption, fuel consumption since refuelling, average speed and total run time.

On VX, Kakadu and ZR models, owners can tailor vehicle functions, such as door unlock sequence, lights-off timing and auto headlamps-on level.

Three-zone climate-control air-conditioning is featured in GXL, VX and Kakadu specs, offering separate controls for both front occupants and controls for rear-seat passengers.

Three-door SX and ZR models have dual-zone air-conditioning, with separate controls for the driver and front passenge. The entry-level GX offers push-button single-zone manual air-conditioning as standard.

Four audio systems are available across the Prado range, each offering iPod, Bluetooth, USB and Aux connectivity.

Prado GX, GXL and SX models offer a six-speaker audio system with AM/FM radio and CD player. The VX howvever comes with a nine-speaker audio system, including a six-disc CD multi-changer. Kakadu, SX, ZR, GXL and VX models feature steering-mounted audio controls.

The three-door ZR and the Kakadu five-door both offer a premium Pioneer audio system with DVD-based satellite navigation. The range-topping Kakadu also offers rear-seat DVD entertainment as standard equipment.

Mechanical

There are two engines on offer for new Prado; one petrol and one diesel.

Producing 202kW at 5600rpm and 381Nm of torque at 4400pm (with 310Nm available from 1200rpm), the 4.0 litre V6 petrol engine can be paired with a six-speed manual or a five-speed automatic transmission with sequential shifting.

Fuel economy has been improved by 12 percent on the five-door petrol automatic, listing a fuel consumption figure of 11.5 l/100km, while the petrol manual lists a figure of 13.0 l/100km.

The Prado's 3.0 litre turbo-diesel, standard in the three-door bodystyle and the five-door GX, gets new injectors and a front-mounted intercooler.

Producing 127kW at 3400rpm and 410Nm between 1600 to 2800rpm, the turbo-diesel engine lists a fuel consumption figure of 8.5 l/100km in automatic guise, and 8.8 l/100km when paired with the manual transmission.

The three-door automatic turbo-diesel lists a fuel economy of 8.3 l/100km.

Both the six-speed manual and five-speed automatic transmissions are matched to a full-time four-wheel-drive system with a lockable Torsen centre differential and two-speed transfer.

For smoother shifting, the six-speed manual features a triple-cone synchromesh on first, second and third gears. The manual transmission is available on five-door GX and GXL model grades only.

Replacing the conventional transfer lever, the new Prado has a dial to control the high/low transfer settings.

Down below, the Prado's front double-wishbone suspension has been designed to enhance straight-line and braking stability and to reduce roll-steer, automatically adjusting the front and rear anti-roll bars to suit driving conditions.

Long-travel five-link rear suspension features at the rear, and Toyota says a balance of optimum roll-stiffness, a low roll-centre and low roll-steer has been achieved.

According to Toyota, the new Prado was designed to "drive like a sports car" on the road. While it may be more than a little wide of that claim, as our 'first drive' proved, the new Prado's refined suspension is as capable on-road as off it.

The five-door VX and Kakadu models get Toyota's Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System, which first appeared on the LandCruiser 200 Series.

In short, the KDSS system provides maximum wheel articulation off-road, and a comfortable 'flat' ride on-road.

For braking, the new Prado features four-piston brake callipers up front, while the front ventilated rotors have been increased in thickness from 28mm to 32mm, leading to a 14 percent increase in heat capacity.

Pricing

Pricing

5-door wagon
5-door wagon $55,990^
GXL petrol manual $60,990^
GXL turbo-diesel manual $61,990^
VX petrol auto $74,490
VX turbo-diesel auto $75,490
Kakadu petrol auto $87,990
Kakadu turbo-diesel auto $88,990
3-door
SX turbo-diesel auto $55,990
ZR turbo-diesel auto $65,990
Advanced safety pack (Kakadu, ZR) $2,500
Seven-seat option (GX) $2,500

^Add $2500 for automatic transmission.

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Filed under: review, wagon, Toyota, petrol, diesel, toyota prado, 4wd, family, 6cyl, 5door

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  • craigMM says,
    5 years ago
    Overpriced, overweight, overrated.
  • Adrian says,
    5 years ago
    "According to Toyota, the new Prado was designed to “drive like a sports car” on the road"

    BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    Geez Toyota are full of themselves! (Nothing new there I guess)

    Overall, I think the new Prado is uglier, more expensive and a waste of space. But they will still sell thousands to all the Soccer Mums out there *eye roll*
  • david says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    bigger bigger bigger in this time when are they going to start getting smaller , it is bigger that a land cruiser was in the early 80s no wonder the fuel economy figuires are so bad . We need the car companys to start reducing the size of vehicles it means less weight and then better fuel economy and better performance not to mention less natural resources required to build them
  • Jacob says,
    5 years ago
    Shocking interior...don't like it at all...plus way too expensive ...stop getting greedy Toyota
  • Mike says,
    5 years ago
    I have had a look at the new Prado and it is not worth the money..Would rather buy a 12 month old BMW X5 for the same money and in 5 years time the BMW will be worth more than the Prado...It is at least 10k over priced..Toyota is just too greedy
    • TRD001 says,
      3 years ago
      4 likes
      You have to be kidding right? An X5 have a better resale thn a Prado? did you even do any form of research before you opened your mouth? what a load of uneducated trash.
  • Nath says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    I always wonder why 3 doors in 4WD are the same price as 5 doors? You would think they would be a bit less.
  • Chris says,
    5 years ago
    Prado looks good I will buy one I can afford one it will be well built it will hold it's value and my soccer mum wife and 5 kids will love it I will drive it to frazer island it will not get bogged it will go off road all the time it will pick the kids up from school .Horses for co***s pull you poor little heads in if you can't afford one.
  • Steven A says,
    5 years ago
    Well Im trying to remain open minded but this is more baloney from Toyota.

    This vehicle may be up there with refinement and technology but its cleary "OVER PRICED, OVER WEIGHT & OVER RATED".

    I cant get past the retro interior and externally its the usual generic weird Toyota look where ever thing looks as though its been pulled, pushed and squashed, not a good look, its the same for Lexus!.

    The introduction of the two door is another Mitsubishi influence as was the birth of Prado some time ago.
    Toyota had to combat the Pajero by developing a similar vehicle with a similar name.
    If you can beat them just copy them.....
  • AB says,
    5 years ago
    Chris,
    I just came back from Cooloola National Park and watched countless 120 series prado's getting bogged becase the IFS front ends sat too low and they basically beached themselves on the ruts.
    We were in a gutless beaten up troopy which had no problems at all.
    Toyota 4WD's are not what they used to be. They may have endless amounts of driver assists, but when your body sits to low to the ground all those electronics mean nothing!
  • jimbob says,
    5 years ago
    AB - 4WDs with IFS front ends lack articulation as you can see in the pics for this article (the downward travel of the front wheels is a lot more limited), but they generally offer more clearance under their diffs than live axle cars.

    Check it out next time...
  • AB says,
    5 years ago
    Jimbob,
    thanks for telling me what I already know.
    IFS 4WD's also have a bash plate under them to protect the more delicate set up. This is what I continuously see bottoming out.
    check it out next time....
  • Russell says,
    5 years ago
    33 grand difference between 5 door wagon and Kakadu diesel. I think Toyota is getting greedier by the year. Every year the Toyotas just get bigger and heavier. I hope the fast improving Korean vehicles bring them back to earth with a thud.
  • David says,
    5 years ago
    3 likes
    Steven A, 'the vehicle may be up there with technology and refinement but its clearly overpriced, overweight and over rated'. This antedote or collection of your opinion is quite contradictory, yes you must be a pajero owner. Mike, question: will a bmw x5 go offroad and also it keeps approximately 60 percent of it's original value compared to the prado's superior 62 percent; which means more money come trade in. AB, by the way the new prado has 220 mm of ground clearance compared to the troop carriers 215 mm of ground clearance, so they were probably just inexperienced offroad drivers.David, fuel economy as low as 8.8 litres per 100km is very good fuel consumption, in fact it's equal to a 4 cylinder camry's and beats many other small cars, so know your facts. Everyone: If the prado's such a bad suv, then why is it the highest selling medium-large suv on the market, why has it won overland 4wd magazines best medium sized four wheel drive award (for more than two years in a row) and finally why has toyota received first place in JD power's reliability and durability awards!..I rest my case...
  • Steven A says,
    5 years ago
    David,
    We are all entitled to our opinion and some of us are more objective than others it seems.
    Im not making contradictory comments and Im not a Pajero owner but I think its clear that you may have an affiliation of sorts with Toyota.
    Just because most everyone here is contributing their personal opinion and is stating facts that clearly you dont agree with doesnt make them wrong.
    No doubt there are good points about the new model Toyota PraJero but I stand by my coments and I keep in mind that the current generation Mitsubishi Pajero is nearing the end of its model life and has consistently been a multi-award winning vehicle and its new Diesel engine may even be more fuel efficient or similar to that of the new PraJero.
    Also more sales dont necessarily mean a superior product, just look at the problem plagued Holden Commodore.
    Hmmm David if you are a happy Toyota owner then good for you, not everyone demands exciting designs and generic designs are fine too.
    Enough said, Im boarding a plane now and wont be reading or responding to any further.
  • disco stu says,
    5 years ago
    just wondering which toyota dealership you work for David? smile
  • David says,
    5 years ago
    2 likes
    I don't work for toyota or even own a toyota. However, if the new prado 150 series is a such a bad proposition then please sugguest another 4wd for the price that can equal the toyota's reliability, durability, quality and even fuel economy. Sure the new prado is quite expensive, but with cars, you generally 'get what you've paid for'.
  • SteveC says,
    5 years ago
    I am with David on this one!
    It seems to me that there is a **** load of tyre kickers out there, that all know best!
    I have owned Holden's, Ford's, Mitsubishi's and Toyota's.
    It's hard to go back to any other make once you have owned a Toyota, the difference sometimes is not in your face, but ofter a few months OWNING a toyota, it is obvious once you go back!
    No I do not work for Toyota, yes my last 2 cars have been toyota, and with the new Prado on order, so will be my 3rd!
  • Nicole says,
    5 years ago
    I own a 2008 Toyota Prado Grande and I'm a soccer mum with 2 kids and I absolutely love the car, its the safest I've ever owned and has all the features we need as a family .

    Would I order a newer one? Absolutely! And as Chris said 'if you can't afford one then bollock it all you like'.
  • Luke says,
    5 years ago
    I had completely decided on buying the Mitsubishi Pajero X, at $10k less than the Prado and what I believe is a more advanced and is more powerful diesel engine, felt great to drive compared to Prado too (on the road) although only took the full size wagons for a drive. Mitsubishi has stopped making the 3 door Pajero (and all petrol versions) for 2010, so now I am ordering a Prado... The look grows on me every time I see it, and all of the gim***y extras on the Prado will surely provide hours of entertainment.
  • danje says,
    5 years ago
    ...well after all that talk,the fact is toyota is losing its styling and design prowess all their new models seem to be balooning and bulky!!!...this goes for the new corolla,prado,VX,mark X...I dont know about their performance but for me design comes first and the only new model worth mentioning is the 2007 caldina.At this rate,toyota is indeed loosing its swagga.
  • Chris says,
    5 years ago
    Loosing it's SWAGGA dont't think the prado was built for little boys in da hood. My wife just drove the new prado and put her order in on the gxl on the road for $60 750 not a bad price. Drive it soccer mums you will love it as we do .
  • David says,
    5 years ago
    Hi, chris
    I just drove the new prado and thought it was amazing. the dealer told us $70,000 drive away and that toyota wont be discounting their new car; I was just wondering what toyota dealership you went to for your fantastic deal. Thanks for your time.
  • Chris says,
    5 years ago
    Hi david If they want that sale tell them to match it ,if not try someone who will . Ross Llewellyn motors is where I buy my cars and they are great to deal with.
  • David says,
    5 years ago
    Thanks Chris, i'll give them a try.
  • Jeremy says,
    5 years ago
    I bought a GXL new in January 2007 for $53500. I recently received a trade-in price on it for $45500 from two separate dealerships. To say I am happy with the resale figure of the Prado after three years is an understatement.
  • Greg says,
    5 years ago
    Previously owned a 2005 GXL Prado manual after many years in Holdens and found it to be one of the best cars i have ever owned. Traded the Prado for a Lexus IS250X and got really spoilt and am now putting the wife into a Kluger Grande. Looked at many brands at all different prices but still came back to Toyota. Sure they can be a little bland with their designs but great build quality, reliability, resale and brand strength its hard to go wrong.
  • RV Consultant says,
    5 years ago
    Guys - lets face it - you are paying for quality and technology here. That is why they hold their value so well. No matter what you say, you cannot argue with the fact that this is cutting edge technology, good quality, and strong resale. What more can you ask for in a car?
  • Required says,
    5 years ago
    how much this car in US $
  • nqquyv says,
    5 years ago
    Hi,
    For all of you arguiing about this rubish car.

    All 4wd's are waste of space and of course money, you dont need to drive 50 thousand or 200 thousand dollar 4wd to drive them to work, let's donate some of your petrol money to the people who needs. not to mention expensive servicing or even changing tyres, they're 3 to 4 times more than normal sedan cars.

    Most of you would probaby drive them to work everyday, and 1 in 5 would take it to the bush or to the beach once a year. so it work out a lot cheaper to just hire one when you needed them.

    Don't waste your money for nothing, use it wisely. Thank You

    Nqquyv.
  • Erwin says,
    5 years ago
    Why do Australians like to bag and knock things they know little about? Kinda gets me rolling my eyes with the soccer mum tags.
    The Prado is king for all rounder everything.Heck,why would i buy a Prado if i just do 4 -wheel drivng? Because we drive it to work also and shop init ! and even take it to Fraser every year.

    I must say,the new look scares me a little but maybe it will grow on me like the VL commodore.Maybe the stlye hits me because the side guard flanks have been deleted.

    Im wanting the GXL deisel and trade my 2004 GXL auto petrol

    any idea of trade in values people?



    The Prado is KING-Game over !
  • David says,
    5 years ago
    Check out redbook.com.au, its what dealers use to give you a trade in price, its also accurate within a few thousand dollars depending on the vehicles condition. By the way nqquyv stick to the toyota prius and continue hugging trees.
  • Chris says,
    5 years ago
    Have owned the 150 series for 2 weeks and travelled 1500 klms it is as you would expect if not better. The new look grows on you and it will become better looking then it's lil brother. Does not seem to be as powerfull as the 120 but it is a new motor still taking it easy. MORE THEN HAPPY SO FAR .
  • dotis says,
    5 years ago
    To dispense with the tosser talk and get to the facts - I have a GXL auto diesel 120 series. It's the fifth Prado I have had for good reasons -
    Better built, better supported all over Aus, better resale, better travelling range, good economy & so good to use day by day.
    Suer they have been used as shopping trollies, fishing vehicles, occasional bush bashers and towing a large off road van (regularly) in remote areas of our great land.
    To the weenies who say the're too big and too heavy on fuel, they use less road space and fuel than the good old Commode or rusty Falcon. So what's the problem?
    Well the new 150 has grown too fat, too expensive, it's lost 30 litres of fuel capacity and the engines have to lug an extra 200 kg of metal. Looks ok though.
    How's that for balanced comment folks?
  • Jammo says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    hi to all the readers! to start with am not an aussie and am not an american. i dnt live any where near australia or the usa either. and more i do not work for toyota! as the saying goes "beauty is in the eyes of the beholder". well to judge the new prado to be ugly or nice is up to one's own opinion. but talking abt reliabiliy i am 100% toyota fan! i own 3 previous prado models and was really satisfied. i also own a Benz Ml 350 and a BMW 3 series. nothing really beats when ur using an off roader. who cares if u only drive it for work or shopping! that's the fun of it! my camry also is doing well! so to all of u who hates the new prado let urself drool and to all prado lovers kudos to everyone and enjoy ur safe ride! THE END...
  • Jammo says,
    5 years ago
    oh yeah btw to add some more... i just got my new VX-L model as they call it here and is very excited to roll arnd town! talking abt driving 4x4s just for work well it really is an advantage to everything. imagine the luggage space the sturdiness and all the challenges u wl be encountering. i am just comparing it driving with a sedan. as previously mentioned i also own a camry but find it not quite comfortable to drive it around in difficult areas. the ML that i got performed also quite well but i do not know with benz sad to say the quality is really deteriorating! i hope d germans will be awake one of these days! stop letting the americans ruin the brand! i presumed not all readers will agree but everyone has their own opinion to express!!! happy driving evryone watever s ur ride!!!
  • fitzy says,
    5 years ago
    my first comment is to david who states dealers get trade prices from red book as a motor dealer i can tell you this is not true we look at trades as a commodity and work our prices on supply and demand.if you look at red book on the 120 series prado you will see it is well below what they are actually selling for.the 120 series prado would have possibly the best retained value of any vehicle i can remember in 25yrs in the business and to the guy who said he was buying a pajero for 10k less than a prado he will be 10-15k wosre off in a couple of years.i just sold my 120 series prado and got(privately) $350.00 less than i paid for it new, and id had it for 18mths and done nearly 40000klms, that you cant beat!!
  • says,
    5 years ago
    I have just purchased the 2010 gxl Prado. At first i was not sure about the new look but 1 test drive later and i had one in the garage.As for getting a better resale on bmw x5 you must be joking. I just sold my 2005 gxl for 39000.00 how"s that for resale.
  • says,
    5 years ago
    I've just ordered my 2010 Prado diesel gxl. Could anyone please tell me the pros and cons of ap ceramic kote? I know nothing about it and would appreciate any input from anyone who knows anything about it. Also, would you recommend the window tinting? I was just wondering if Toyota is trying to rip me off and these products are available elsewhere for a cheaper price or are they worth including in the price.
  • says,
    5 years ago
    hey guys hold on hold on !!!
    WHY over priced when you are gettting a better quality
    WHY BMW ,, when u r getting better deal
    WHY not to get on raod and off road - best features in one

    I bought Prado -- Kakadu and i m loving it , my freind bought X5 at same time
    but he is regreting for his decision adn i m proud ,,
    it far goood fuel economy and lots of true and goood 4 WD feature which
    BMW and X5 and PAJERO EXCEED havent got it ,,

    try and drive and then make comments ,,,
  • says,
    5 years ago
    2 likes
    I own a BMW 5 series, and am moving to a 4WD for more space and offroad adventures. Currently get v good fleet discount on Toyota and Mitsubishi, so price is not really an issue, although even after fleet discount the Prado comes in around $5k more expensive.

    I've been looking at NT Pajero ACTIV 2010 and 150 Prado GXL 2010. Drove both today (again!) for back to back comparisons. Most of my driving when purchased will be 80% on road (school runs!) 20% off road (dirt tracks, some ruts etc, no rock hopping though).

    So far my impressions are:

    Interior:
    Prado has slightly more 'quality' feel about cabin. As said come from 5 series BMW, so Toyota not quite there, but its a nice place to sit with good fit and finish. However - the air vents are damn ugly and stare at you as you drive (no doubt blowing air right into your face), the seats and interior spec levels are average, and it doesn't feel like a $60k car.
    Pajero slightly cheaper plastic feel, but better appointed, especially with satnav standard. Also like the layout MUCH more than Prado - seems cleaner, less 'stacked up', with dials etc look better. Seats also slightly more comfy than Prado, and it looks like the material will wear better. ACTIV appointments such as silver finishes etc also nicer than plainer/more boring Prado. About same amount of cupholders/storage bin (slightly more in Pajero than I could find in Prado, but Prado has a neat vent in the middle box, don't know how effective though). All up I just felt like being in the Pajero a lot more. The Prado felt somehow 'depressing' - perhaps the Pajero had better light coming into the vehicle / glasshouse design.

    Rear (Middle Row) Seats
    Pajero's are slightly wider and a bit more comfy, although Prado's will slide forward, giving 3rd row seat dwellers some more (but limited) leg room. Prado gets rear aircon as standard while Pajero only gets vents. Don't know if this makes massive difference though. About even here.

    Rear (3rd row) Seats & Boot - where it counts for those soccer moms:
    Prado - the 150ltr tank is a good idea, however, I beleive there are only 2 4WD routes in Australia where this level of fuel capacity is required while the extra tank takes up a HUGE amount of floor space, meaning the boot is much smaller than the Pajero and much higher off the ground, making it much, much more difficult to load luggage into the area (much higher lifting required - not good when loading a baby buggy!). Rear fold flat seats are wider and somewhat roomier than Pajero, are easier to unfold and fold (slightly) and have 50/50 split. However,
    Pajero seats are still easy to fold, and can be removed completely, leaving another large storage space in the boot. Both Prado and Pajero seats aren't exactly comfortable, and will only be for kids/short distances, so happy to make small sacrifice for overall much larger bootspace. Clear winner is Pajero - I suggest prospective soccer moms try lifting a few very heavy shopping bags into the very high load area of the Prado, or a few campers try and squeeze as much gear into the back of a Prado compared to a Pajero.

    Exterior:
    Prado - its a matter of personal opinion, and it may grow on you over time like the 'Bangle' BMW's, however I find the new Prado's just plain, plain ugly. Its just me. I don't know if I could face walking out to the drive every day to see that contorted, sharp angled face. The Pajero looks much more 'in line' and comfortable to look at. Then again, perhaps its an 'old' design which will be radically redone in the next model (around 2 years away I beleive). Overall, personally I could much more easily live with Pajero's face, although I'm not too keen on the 'semi covered' spare wheel. ACTIV model also gets nudge bar while front parking sensors thrown in to match base price of GXL.

    Drive - Engine:
    Prado's engine is marginally quieter and smoother than Pajero's - drive both a full throttle / kickdown and you will notice, however neither are near as quiet as a petrol and personally I like the rattle of a diesel - something primative about it. Pajero is leaps and bounds more responsive than Prado - both from standing start and kick down, the push of torque in your back is noticably different. The Prado is still afine engine, just lacking the urge the Pajero has. Drivetrain wise both changed gear as nicely as each other, however I love the 2WD option of Pajero, which will save further on fuel.

    Drive - On Road Handling: Hands down to the Pajero for 'car like' handling due to monocoque chassis. While Prado is not as wallowy as 120 series, it still feels much more floaty and heavy round corners. My BMW has 'M Sport' suspension, so very good round corners, but very harsh over bumps. Both Pajero and Prado are great over rough surface, slightly harsher in Pajero but really splitting hairs. Again, on-road handling due to more responsive engine and better handling goes to Pajero, although do like smoothness of Prado.

    Offroad: Didn't take either offroad unfortunately, but based on reviews I've read both are far more capable than I probably am as a driver, and I'm sure I'll stop before they do. Prado has better wheel articulation meaning it can 'drop its wheels' better for when the chassis is on uneven ground (i.e. deep ruts etc), while I beleive the Pajero has better traction control intelligence/driver technology in their MATT system. One problem with Prado is that it CANNOT be ordered with rear-difflock in GXL form. Sure, you can go an aftermarket airlocker, but who wants to spend money instantly on a new car? The comparison price I have for Pajero includes diff-lock, which I beleive will be very handy in sticky situations. The Prado's 150 litre tank also helps it here, but again, pretty extreme situation given Pajero can go nearly 800kms on a single tank (1500 for Prado!). Pajero also has more torquey engine and much better tow capacity, both are about even on approach/depart angles/wade depths. Prado is up on the Pajero in terms of remote touring/dealer support, although if I were going to do that type of offroading I would by a Troopie or 80/100 Series LC. Conclusion - given 70% of time will see car on-road, and both are probably only as capable as the driver offroad, I'd again go Pajero.

    Reliability: Agree Toyota has a fantastic reputation with reliability, and my mate's Kluger we call 'the fridge' simply because it is so reliable, like a good appliance. That said, I have scoured the forums on both Pradopoint and Pajero Club Victoria and can find very little in terms of reliability problems with Pajero (some problems with computer chips, which were resolved by factory) and other niggles, while Pradopoint mentions broken diffs and cracked firewalls due to bull bars on the 120 series. In the end though the Pajero warranty is the killer - 5 year bumper to bumper and 10 year drive train (meaning engine, gear box, diff, transfer case, axles) is simply amazing and means I will have virtual worry-free driving for 10 years on the Pajero, while having to rely solely on the legendary Toyota reliability after 3rd year on Prado. Both have capped price servicing, so in this area, Pajero wins hands down, simply because of the amazing warranty.

    Resale: Yes, Prado's do have better re-sale, but in my experience (judging by Redbook and car sale prices v new price), both come out fairly even when comparing grade to grade. Prado may be slightly better but I intend to keep the car past the sharpest part of its depreciation curve (around 3 years) after which we are talking about a few thousand dollars, which the Prado is almost making up in new price.

    Unbiased conclusion: pretty clear its the Pajero, although its a very tough call. The Prado is a great car which deserves a lot of respect. I asked the dealer why Toyota decided to go with the carry over engine despite it being bottom of the class, dealer said was to keep price down. I don't understand this as I could chip the engine, get similar reliability with much better output and efficiency. Its drivetrain is simply too old and slow for a heavier car, inability to fit rear difflock from factory is a crime, the boot is just awful in terms of loading and space, it drives on road much more 'rolly' than Pajero and I doubt I will see its offroad prowess to its fullest.

    Happy drives!
  • says,
    4 years ago
    hey guys i'm planning on getting the D4D GXL does it have the the 6 cd player or is it just one and is there any problems in adding KDSS? howmuch does it cost
  • says,
    4 years ago
    1 like
    2010 GXL Prado , its more sophisticated, lots of features and better safety protection , I think my passengers at the back will no longer complaining in the future cos they have their own aircondioning. However, because too much features that means you have to familiarise all the controls and which preferably dont like it, i wonder if they can do just a voice control it more easy. I have problem forgetting car keys, this car no need to use the key to start the ignition, all you have to make sure you have the key in your pocket.
  • SDEK01 says,
    4 years ago
    1 like
    LOL... read most of all you guys comments. I have just finsihed test driving most of the 4x4 vehicles money can buy. Triton, Pajero, Dmax, Navara, Discovery 4, SR5 and the new Prado D4D. I have spent countless hours researching and investigating all the cars, user/ company reviews everything you can think of and i can honestly say that the best vehcile for the $$$ is the new GXL Prado. Of course the Landrover was nice being the Discovery 4 HSE model however over 100K i dont think so (SOCCER MUM CAR).
    I was put off at first by the price tag on the Prado but you really do get what you pay for. Mitsubishi, Nissan = Shit compared to the Prado.
    For all the people who complain about the IFS or what ever fron suspension and it getting bogged etc BOOO HOO. If you really want to go rock hopping or Soft Sand driving 2+ lift kit and 33" tires.
    Believe me i went into test driving these cars with an open mind... I AM NOW SOLD on the PRADO!!! no questions asked. I strongly believe you get what you pay for.
    • Slick Jones says,
      3 years ago
      4 likes
      Well SDEK01 dude I'm sure you're happy with your purchase. I've seen many posts here explaining, in great detail, why the Pajero kicks the Playdo's @ss.

      The Playdo is an outdated engine with about as much guts as an old Lada, a walloy ride which almost makes you feel sea-sick, a rubbish warranty, a weak gearbox which has proven to overheat on the mere sniff of a hill and suspension so soft it hangs its back end up on sidewalk.

      You can keep your Playdo for the school runs.
  • moussa magassa says,
    4 years ago
  • Paul says,
    2 years ago
    Prado and Cruiser overpriced? Yes! probably due to mine sites paying extortional prices because they can. But the underlying card is that they are proven through and through. Personally i love the V8 Cruisers as they cant be matched onsite and off road but as a car to drive in the hustle and bustle is just is not practical anymore, fuel, size, wear and tare, parking etc, So although branded a soccer mums car the prado is ideal for my family as my lady has a reliable city car that does not suck too much fuel but when Im home the prado jacked up and with some decent boots goes anywhere reliably with a little fella that is the key. Its a lot more comfortable getting to the camping sites etc for a half the price on fuel compared to the beasty cruisers.
    After test driving the Colarados, Tritons, Navaras, hiluxes and cruisers, the prado was the most comfortable, smoothest ride with plenty of torque for the average 4x4 enthusiest and with 07 Prados still going for $30,000 plus with 230-250,000kms on the clock the resale price alone justified me spending the extra money on a 2010 GX Prado with 80,000 kms on the clock. as i will not need another car for 5-10 years problem free. cool
  • Peter Burdett says,
    2 years ago
    1 like
    I owned a 2006 120 series petrol Prado & loved it although it lacked any features what so ever. I recently hired a 150 series GX Prado & was shocked at how bad it was. diesel is gutless especially in NT at 130 km/hr when you want to pass a 4 trailer road train. Make sure you have about 3 kms to get past. Then there's the handling!! Get to my first round about & nearly run it into a kerb! understeer in dangerous proportions. Then when I hit the brakes the car pitches front to back. What have Toyota done with the rear seating. raised the floor by nd 5 inches so getting heavy luggage in is a strain & there's no foot well anyway. Shame Toyota this is a dangerous car to drive & costs $60K you have to be kidding the arrogance grows!
  • Dragi says,
    2 years ago
    2 likes
    Test drove a Prado and way underpowered with that weight would be lucky to pull a horse float up to 100km/h in 5 minutes. Test drove a Jeep Grand Cherokee and talk about bag for your buck. Pulls an extra tonne and actually has features for your money. Oh and handles around town with a bit of zip. Can't wait till my new one comes in.
    • Andrew says,
      2 years ago
      1 like
      piece of overpriced junk. Go with the original - the Pajero. Prado is just an imitation.

      this is why the prado sucks: the engine is gutless. the rear axle sags and hangs. the auto gearbox overheats and shuts down rendering the vehicle disabled. the ride will make you sea-sick. the traction control is useless and leaves your wheels spinning. the thing looks plain ugly. this is a 4wd never meant for the bush, for soccor moms and shopping centre car parks only thanks.
  • Keith says,
    2 years ago
    2 likes
    Overall Disappointed... value not there!

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