Mike Stevens | Oct 12, 2009

VICROADS HAS TODAY announced higher fines for motorists caught speeding, with 'on-the-spot' fines for driving more than 30km/h over the limit rising from $310 to $380.

To be introduced from November, the new higher penalties follow figures released last month that showed Victorian speeding fine revenue has risen dramatically in the past year.

VicRoads Acting Director for Road User Safety, Antoinetta Cavallo, said today that the new penalties reflect the danger posed by speeding or drink driving. They follow increased penalties introduced in May for not wearing a seatbelt or driving while talking on a mobile phone.

"The increased penalties target extremely dangerous behaviour which are known contributors to fatalities on Victoria’s roads.

"Speeding directly contributes to at least 30 per cent of deaths on Victoria’s roads each year. Penalties will now better reflect the seriousness of high level speeding offences," Ms Cavallo said.

In addition to the increased fine, motorists travelling 30km/h or more over the speed limit will lose up to eight demerit points.

Drivers caught speeding 45km/h or more over the limit will face court-imposed fines of up to $2336.

Motorists with a blood-alcohol level of 0.10, which causes a five times greater risk of an incident, face immediate licence suspension, a fine of more than $526 and a potential court-imposed fine of $2336.

"These tougher penalties are aimed at drivers who continue to flout the road rules at great risk to themselves and others.

"We know penalties play an important role in discouraging dangerous behaviour on the roads. In addition to increased financial penalties, demerit points for some of the new road rules which will take effect in November 2009 will be introduced," she said.

The new penalties and increased loss of demerit points forms part of the Government’s road safety strategy arrive alive 2008 – 2017, which aims to reduce the road toll by a further 30 percent.

Last year, Victoria recorded its lowest road toll since records began, with 303 deaths.

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