2010 MN Triton GLX-R And GL-R Launch Review

Tim O'Brien | 50 Comments

2010 MN Triton GLX-R And GL-R First Drive Review

IT'S GRUNTIER, is considerably more refined, uses less fuel, has a longer and larger cargo tub, and is more comfortable at the wheel than the outgoing 3.2 litre turbo-diesel ML Triton.

So, Triton enthusiasts, you can stop panicking now. The new MY10 MN Triton is better. It’s as simple as that.

And don’t get all het up about the downsizing of the diesel up front – down from 3.2 litres to 2.5. The new 4D56 HP (for ‘high-power’) unit is a cracker. Sure, it’s smaller; but it’s a much smoother, quieter and lustier piece of work.

Its 131kW of power is class-leading; and the 400Nm (in manual versions) it produces at just 2000rpm, is only shaded by the Navara’s 403Nm. That’s a gain of 11 percent in power and 17 percent in torque outputs over the previous 4M41 3.2 litre diesel engine.

(Automatic variants get similar power but a lower 350Nm of torque.)

Those numbers work very well on the road and even better in the rough. Importantly, if you are considering a Triton for work duties – you know, concrete mixer, three lard-arses and a cubit of mud in the tray – or your boat has the dimensions and subtlety of a bulk ore carrier, the MN Triton also has improved towing capacity.

By how much? Up to 2.7 tonne (braked) for the dual-cab pickups, and 3.0 tonne (braked) for cab-chassis models.

With standard driver and front passenger SRS airbags, and stability control and side and curtain airbags available on diesel dual-cab models, the MN Triton is also safer.

We took two of the new models out of Byron Bay for a stint of highway, gravel road and off-road driving; the new GL-R manual for the on-road sections, and the GLX-R in automatic into the rough.

We’ll talk about the fight in the dog shortly (and the news is encouraging), but what’s the MN Triton got – inside and out – and where has it been improved?

The Drive

It’s no secret (read through our earlier reviews): we like the way the Triton drives here at TMR.

The previous ML model, in our view, led the segment for its superior mix of on-road comfort and off-road capability. Its replacement, the MN, is better again – or so it would seem after this first drive.

Of course, a longer test across a wider range of driving conditions and surfaces will tell the tale (the test vehicles were also carrying a little ballast in the tub, arguably to better emulate real-world driving conditions).

But, on first impressions, the MN would appear to have raised the bar for the versatile workhorse cum family transport commercial sector.

The GL-R we had for the highway and gravel roads leg proved again just how well Mitsubishi sets up a ‘compromise’ suspension. When you’re buying a 4x4 work-ute with real off-road capability, you probably prefer not have your eyeballs shaken out of your head whenever you point it at the tarmac. Probably.

Some can be a tad wearing to live with on this score, but not the Triton. It’s quite at home on the highway and surprisingly well-balanced and easy to live with even on secondary roads.

Its double wishbone front suspension and leaf-spring rear with solid axle works better than a bald description of its engineering might suggest (it’s a well-worn and well-proven combo).

The Triton though manages to do it better than most. The suspension tuning provides good initial compliance, allowing the suspension to ‘soak-up’ road imperfections, while being firm enough to carry nearly a tonne in the tray (972kg to be exact) without scraping along the road on its belly.

Relative to its light commercial sector, it is quite free of jarring over poor roads and broken bitumen. It is also commendably quiet with very little wind noise and road roar finding its way into the cabin – the Triton is better, in fact, than the new Outlander on the road roar front.

It’s the gutsy 4D56 2.5 litre HP diesel however that most transforms the drive.

The evident (and sometimes wearing) diesel rattle of the older 4M41 3.2 litre unit is much improved with the 2.5 litre in the new model. At the wheel it is all-but absent. On road, and when working, there is just a nice rounded ‘hum’ accompanying things which is neither intrusive nor unpleasant.

Also helping things is the smooth-shifting and nicely weighted five-speed manual transmission we had in the GL-R for the road legs of the trip. The clutch action is a little long, but the ratios are well suited to the characteristics of the engine and the right gear falls nicely to hand when rowing the MN along.

It is quite car-like and well-mannered on the road, and it’s only when pushing through turns or on undulating secondary roads that you’re reminded of the MN’s commercial underpinning.

Sure, it’s a high-riding ute so it’s not designed for hunting down the apexes. But, provided you make allowances for the inevitable understeer, it is surprisingly stable and can be rowed along with confidence.

Even over the worst stretches, you wouldn’t describe it as harsh or unforgiving. But the quality is in the breeding. From the day the first Pajero arrived twenty-five plus years ago, Mitsubishi has always managed the highway and off-road compromise better than most.

For the off-road work, we swapped into the GLX-R automatic. With Mitsubishi’s ‘Super Select’ 4WD system below, diff-lock and ample torque underfoot, the GLX-R made short work of things in the rough.

While the tracks were dry, and would have presented more of a challenge to the Bridgestone Dueler boots had there been mud underfoot, the Triton had no trouble with the deeply rutted steep climbs and descents.

The Super Select system is little short of brilliant. By directing traction front and back to where it can be used, it allows you to tackle things steadily, to simply rely on the 400Nm of torque underfoot and to ‘wind’ your way up and over obstacles.

We’ve come to trust and appreciate the ML over even the toughest off-road tracks. On the basis of this first drive, the MN would appear to have lost none of its predecessor’s ability as a hard-working and almost effortlessly capable 4x4.

The Verdict

The new MN Triton is, in our view, still class leader in the dual-cab 4x4 segment. Its combination of on-road compliance and comfort, coupled with workhorse robustness and genuine off-road capability, tip the scales its way.

Others do some things better, sure, but for sheer versatility and all-round capability, the Triton makes very appealing buying.

Now with a longer tray bed, a stronger but more refined and fuel-efficient diesel, plus some noticeable interior and exterior refinements, the MN is an improved car in nearly every way over the ML.

For those who may have been worried that the move to the smaller diesel would be a retrograde step for Mitsubishi, the reality would appear to be otherwise.

So, whether you have work, play or family duties in mind, put the MN Triton on the list for consideration.

You will likely find, as we have, that sequels can sometimes be better than the original.

The Drive

It’s no secret (read through our earlier reviews): we like the way the Triton drives here at TMR.

The previous ML model, in our view, led the segment for its superior mix of on-road comfort and off-road capability. Its replacement, the MN, is better again – or so it would seem after this first drive.

Of course, a longer test across a wider range of driving conditions and surfaces will tell the tale (the test vehicles were also carrying a little ballast in the tub, arguably to better emulate real-world driving conditions).

But, on first impressions, the MN would appear to have raised the bar for the versatile workhorse cum family transport commercial sector.

The GL-R we had for the highway and gravel roads leg proved again just how well Mitsubishi sets up a ‘compromise’ suspension. When you’re buying a 4x4 work-ute with real off-road capability, you probably prefer not have your eyeballs shaken out of your head whenever you point it at the tarmac. Probably.

Some can be a tad wearing to live with on this score, but not the Triton. It’s quite at home on the highway and surprisingly well-balanced and easy to live with even on secondary roads.

Its double wishbone front suspension and leaf-spring rear with solid axle works better than a bald description of its engineering might suggest (it’s a well-worn and well-proven combo).

The Triton though manages to do it better than most. The suspension tuning provides good initial compliance, allowing the suspension to ‘soak-up’ road imperfections, while being firm enough to carry nearly a tonne in the tray (972kg to be exact) without scraping along the road on its belly.

Relative to its light commercial sector, it is quite free of jarring over poor roads and broken bitumen. It is also commendably quiet with very little wind noise and road roar finding its way into the cabin – the Triton is better, in fact, than the new Outlander on the road roar front.

It’s the gutsy 4D56 2.5 litre HP diesel however that most transforms the drive.

The evident (and sometimes wearing) diesel rattle of the older 4M41 3.2 litre unit is much improved with the 2.5 litre in the new model. At the wheel it is all-but absent. On road, and when working, there is just a nice rounded ‘hum’ accompanying things which is neither intrusive nor unpleasant.

Also helping things is the smooth-shifting and nicely weighted five-speed manual transmission we had in the GL-R for the road legs of the trip. The clutch action is a little long, but the ratios are well suited to the characteristics of the engine and the right gear falls nicely to hand when rowing the MN along.

It is quite car-like and well-mannered on the road, and it’s only when pushing through turns or on undulating secondary roads that you’re reminded of the MN’s commercial underpinning.

Sure, it’s a high-riding ute so it’s not designed for hunting down the apexes. But, provided you make allowances for the inevitable understeer, it is surprisingly stable and can be rowed along with confidence.

Even over the worst stretches, you wouldn’t describe it as harsh or unforgiving. But the quality is in the breeding. From the day the first Pajero arrived twenty-five plus years ago, Mitsubishi has always managed the highway and off-road compromise better than most.

For the off-road work, we swapped into the GLX-R automatic. With Mitsubishi’s ‘Super Select’ 4WD system below, diff-lock and ample torque underfoot, the GLX-R made short work of things in the rough.

While the tracks were dry, and would have presented more of a challenge to the Bridgestone Dueler boots had there been mud underfoot, the Triton had no trouble with the deeply rutted steep climbs and descents.

The Super Select system is little short of brilliant. By directing traction front and back to where it can be used, it allows you to tackle things steadily, to simply rely on the 400Nm of torque underfoot and to ‘wind’ your way up and over obstacles.

We’ve come to trust and appreciate the ML over even the toughest off-road tracks. On the basis of this first drive, the MN would appear to have lost none of its predecessor’s ability as a hard-working and almost effortlessly capable 4x4.

Verdict

The new MN Triton is, in our view, still class leader in the dual-cab 4x4 segment. Its combination of on-road compliance and comfort, coupled with workhorse robustness and genuine off-road capability, tip the scales its way.

Others do some things better, sure, but for sheer versatility and all-round capability, the Triton makes very appealing buying.

Now with a longer tray bed, a stronger but more refined and fuel-efficient diesel, plus some noticeable interior and exterior refinements, the MN is an improved car in nearly every way over the ML.

For those who may have been worried that the move to the smaller diesel would be a retrograde step for Mitsubishi, the reality would appear to be otherwise.

So, whether you have work, play or family duties in mind, put the MN Triton on the list for consideration.

You will likely find, as we have, that sequels can sometimes be better than the original.

Filed under: review, Mitsubishi, diesel, ute, 4wd, mitsubishi triton, commercial, crew cab, Mitsubishi Triton GLX-R, family, 4cyl, mitsubishi triton gl-r, tim o'brien

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  • Tom says,
    5 years ago
    Great review guys, I've been waiting out on buying a ML due to the MN having the bigger tray, good to see its a step forwards in all regards. I was worried a little about the reduced departure angle, but if the rear step is the same as the ML then you can increase the departure angle a bit by simply removing it and replacing with a proper rear bash plate. A 2" lift will do the rest.

    How did the 4D56HP go with turbo lag and low down response, is it as good as the old 4M41?
  • Carl says,
    5 years ago
    Nice review guys. I own the ML and just drove the MN today and agree with everything you said - nothing too wrong with the old one (except those ^#*^*^& seats) but the new version is a sweet ride. The test drive alone convinced me to buy one before I saw your review. The tub is way longer than I need and I would happily forego 150mm or so and save it's ar** from shopping centre bingles, but the extra depth is a good thing. The Hilux and Navara should pack up their bats and balls and go home I reckon wink
  • Adrian says,
    5 years ago
    Sold!
    I've been ready to buy in this segment for about 6 months and with two young kids you simply cannot go past the saftey featuresmof the new MN. It's great to see that it alo rates highly in engine, ride and I must say an improved look - or maybe it has just grown on me over time! Now, the big decision - what colour to buy!
  • David says,
    5 years ago
    Interesting review . As an owner of a ml its great to see improvement in front seat . Why does no one mention the huge problem of carbon build up in the inlet manifold in these egr engines . Mitsubihi had to develop a new manifold with a different sensor position just for this problem .This is not unique to the triton but needs mentioning . Another point is that you will notice the longer tub with regards departure angle nothing major but you must be wary . The triton is great but you will not get near the claimed fuel consumption with any addition ie bull bar /wider tyres . Also as a answer to the new pollution standards the diesel exhaust being reburnt this simply puts crap back through the engine . I removed 2 coffee cups worth from my manifold after 10 000 km . A better solution is needed reviews such as yours could start the ball rolling. Overall a fantastic car which as an overall package beats the competition by quite a few votes.
    • Rob says,
      2 years ago
      What is the easiest way to clean the carbon build up.I took my 2008 VR triton to mitsubishi dealer to diagnose engine light coming on and they tell me its due to carbon build up in the air intake manifold.They said this is why im losing power, i never went there with a lack of power problem only went there for them to diagnose engine light and they tell me its going to cost upwards of $2200.00 for replacement.How do i really know or am i better off trading it in for new model GLX-R. Current triton has done 135,000km.
  • Rob says,
    5 years ago
    2 likes
    Just wondering how the 5 speed auto stacks up compared to the manual and how would it perform in serious offroad situations such as river crossings.

    Thanks
    Rob
  • wayne says,
    5 years ago
    Sorry to make you guys jealous. I pick my mine in two wks time.
  • zane says,
    5 years ago
    Agreed - I have had 4 Tritons, with the current ML, and signed up for a MN Glx-r 2 weeks ago - sad news is a need white - not available until January...but worth the wait wink
  • Carl says,
    5 years ago
    sorry Wayne, I get mine next Tuesday wink
  • Adrian says,
    5 years ago
    Yep I get mine around 8 Nov in the spec I want. Supply is short and the wait is until Feb if you want diff lock. Happy to share Sydney "deal" info if you want - email me at vk2vhf at arrl dot net
    cheers
  • Carl says,
    5 years ago
    hi adrian ... mine was the same - diff lock was delivery mid-late Jan, while they had limited immediate stock for a standard GLX-R. Brisbane prices around $45-$46K on road for a 'deal' with ABN ... not sure how that compares to down South ?
  • Robbo says,
    5 years ago
    GLX-R, auto, tow bar, soft tonneau cover, tray bed liner, tint (front windows), metallic paint, on road with ABN around $49k. Probably paying a bit of a premium for short supply.
  • rick says,
    5 years ago
    iv,e had a glxr with luxury pack fitted leather seats and mitsubishi multi comunication system,it handles and accelerates very well, the ride on the 17 " wheels is very good for a work vehicle.my only complaint is that when you get the mmcs system ,you loose all trip computing capability , distance to empy, ltrs per 100 kms, outside temperasture etc,despite what the salesman says, the system fitted to the triton doesn,t do theses functions,so you get a $ 58000 vehicle that cant tell you the basic trip computing. however the gps system is brilliant and has voice controll functions..
  • dave says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    has any tow any thing such as a caravan with an mn
  • Ros says,
    5 years ago
    We've just bought a GL-R 4X4 Dual Cab with a High Top Canopy (all windows tinted incl canopy) that is arriving in mid Jan. What's the visibility like on these when reversing, Is a Reversing Camera reccommended?

    Also can anyone reccommend a decent GPS model? We wanted one that sits on top of the dash in the middle, one that's good for camping and clear and simle to use. Any ideas?

    Thanks
  • Greg says,
    5 years ago
    Ordered my 2010 GLX R today, with hard tourny, tow bar, tint.
    I have decided on all white, i think will look good and clean in white with the mags, alloy sports & nudge bars.
    47K Drive away - End of Jan delivery.

    Regards Greg
  • Bill says,
    5 years ago
    Ordered the MN GLX-R today and going from the Patrol to the Triton is a big change but couldn't go by the off road and fuel capability .. bigger back seats than Hilux and Navara make this a better car for family needs ... never liked the exterior pod look but doesn't affect me when driving this great ride ....
  • Mitch says,
    5 years ago
    Ordered mine on the 31st of Dec, for opted delivery of March.

    Paid $53000 on Sunshine Coast, QLD Drive away for White GLX-R in Auto with Diff lock, polished aluminium tray, polished head board bar and over cab rack, and towbar kit. Can't wait, looking to fit a Carputer with 7" LCD ASAP.
  • deefa millar says,
    5 years ago
    Where can you get towbars & covers for them & how much
  • Gilles says,
    5 years ago
    Ordered my GLXR in black-auto with sat nav, hard cover, towbar, mats and tub liner for 52500. arrives in feb. ooooohhh cant wait.
  • d jones says,
    5 years ago
    all you triton lovers should change over to isuzu dmax,more of a work horse and will never die
  • d jones is drunk says,
    5 years ago
    ba hah hah hah haha ... an isuzu ... yeah right ... go and drive an MN Triton, then make an informed comment
  • Bunyip says,
    5 years ago
    Ros (or anyone else)
    I am looking at the highline canopy. How deep is it at the highest part and at the front. (either to the uteliner bottom or the metal floor)

    the tomtoms are generally the easiest and most accurate. The 930 is probably the best but if you want to spend less the 720 or 730 or even the one excel are really good. Dependp
    s on if you play music etc.

    Thanks Bunyip
  • Ros says,
    5 years ago
    Thanks Bunyip for that helpful info in regards to the Tom Tom GPS. We ended up getting at Tom Tom XL, they are very easy to use and pretty accurate to
  • Ros says,
    5 years ago
    Sorry I bumped the enter button before I could complete my post...

    What I wanted to say was we will be getting our new Triton within the next couple of weeks - Can't Wait!!! So when it arrive I would be happy to post those measurments through if it's not too late. We do have the ute liner as well.

    We opted for the highline as it offers slightly more hight within the cab then the other genuine Triton cabs avail, so it was an easy decision for us. We felt that getting the highline cab would somewhat compensate a little for any space taken from the ute liner. We've seen a few on the road and they still look great smile

    Hope this info was in some way helpful
    Ros
  • diesel says,
    5 years ago
    tray looks to long now,should have done a bit more to hide those ugly lines...
  • Required says,
    5 years ago
    Diesel you sound like a jealous ML Ownner =)
  • Michael says,
    5 years ago
    I will be travelling around many mine sites in NSW - the look of the GLXR is great - do you reckon this is suitable for my purposes and what recommendations on options do i include as i want a ***ey mouse look - a must is sat nav is this a mitsu option and how good is it and diesel
  • discostu says,
    5 years ago
    hey michael triton would definitly suit your needs - id recommend getting your own sat nav system tho - the integrated one is good - but not great...plus you lose all the features of the multi information display includidng range to empty, fuel consupmtion, ave speed etc...plus its quite expensive (about a $2500 option i think) so for that money you could get something pretty sweet aftermarket and still have about $2000 in your back pocket

    take it for a drive and see for yourself!
  • Michael says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    Thanks discostu

    I was told that the triton is noisy when driving? What are your thoughts?
  • discostu says,
    5 years ago
    getting up to speed there is a bit of noise...but once your cruising i think its fine - not the quietest diesel ever, but certinaly not the loudest either! best thing is just to test drive and see for yourself smile
  • richard says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    does any one have a problem with the cruise control?
    i find at 110 - 120 ks the vehicle seems to get a slight surge thing happening, it,s likethe units trying to keep the speed to accurate,every second, or is this a typical tubo diesel problem?
    i can,t be a lack of power as its easy to put your foot on the accelerator and speed up.
    • Cartia says,
      8 months ago
      Hey did you ever have this problem resolved with the triton cruise control and surge? I have a 2012 model and it started doing exactly what you describe mid last year (2013)?
  • Carl says,
    5 years ago
    Triton is unreal, but definitely needs reversing camera cos its l-o-o-o-ng - the Audiovox one fully wired with LCD replacement rear view mirror is good - got one installed from the www.TheCarKitCompany.com.au mob under $600 - worth its weight in gold in shopping centres. heavy duty tow bar aftermarket from Aranda Towbars $500 good n heavy fits the long tub perfectly and protects the underside.

    Other than that, GLX-R comes with enough stuff you don't need to do much else to it, check out www.newtriton.net for enthusiasts into the vehicle and a few good discussions on mods etc.
  • Carl says,
    5 years ago
    Apparently the Isuzu dealer can post negative rants about the Triton but we are not allowed to expose him here .... hope he enjoys sleeping in his ute ... about all its good for ...
  • Michael says,
    5 years ago
    Hi Everyone
    Thanks to discostu,
    Looking closely at the Triton GLX-R with added options but went to a dealership yesterday and he hit me up full tilt prices - who does the best/good deals as i will deal with whom is a little fair dinkum - it will be fleet as i will be a Novated Lease
  • discostu says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    hey michael

    just go to three dealers and get three prices - tell em whoever
    gives you the best price wins - then watch em fight over each other hehe smile

    or if ur leasing some lease companies can do the negotiations for you or have a preferred dealership they work with - ether way you should come out pretty good smile
  • MATT says,
    5 years ago
    JUST ORDERD NEW MN GL-R TRITON YESTERDAY, BULLBAR,TOW HITCH, SNORKLE, LONG RANGE TANK, DIFF LOCK, S/C AIRBAGS, TUB LINER, TONNEAU COVER, WEATHERSHEILDS, SEAT COVERS, LIGHT PROTECTORS, FLOOR MATS, TINT, PAINT PROTECT, IN SILVER CANT WAIT TO PICK UP LATE FEB. $49862 ABN. SHOULD BE A LITTLE BIT FLASHER THAN MY CURRENT 99 BASE MOD RODEO. AFTER DRIVING 400 KLM IN THE WIFE'S PETROL XTRAIL TO DO THE DEAL AND TEST DRIVE I WAS A LITTLE LET DOWN BY THE POWER OFF THE MARK BUT ONCE IN 2ND WATCH OUT SHE TAKES OFF THEN. I THINK I HAD BEEN IN THE XTRAIL TO LONG.
  • Required says,
    5 years ago
    Hey Matt, $49k sounds like too much for a GL-R, my GLX-R is only $53k and has all those options plus more. The GL-R was only $41k drive away last year, and you also got the tax break. So I can't understand why you waitied until now, seems like you have done yourself out of a bout $12k by not buying last year.
  • MATT says,
    5 years ago
    Hey Required
    One thing you learn when you move to the NT is you pay twice as much for somthing thats not quite what you want. I wanted a GLX and was going to put all the 4x4 gear and after market rims and tyres on it. I wanted the Diff lock and Active stab and Traction control, The GLR and more so the GLXR have to much flash crap i did not want, use or need. The dealer could not get one and said i would have better chance with an GLR or GLXR i went GLR as it still has the head board to tie tall loads in. I wanted a ute for work, pulling a boat off the beaten track to remote fishing spots, and a nice safe drive for the wife and kids. The GLR should cover that. I know i could have got one cheaper on the east coast but its at least $2000 to get one up hear and the dints and spratches are free, trust me i have been through that one.

    PS only just got ABN
  • marian says,
    5 years ago
    I have a 2008 glxr has only done 35000 and they are telling me I need to machine the discs, no-one has ever heard of this before
  • Brett1 says,
    5 years ago
    1 like
    Hey just priced the 2010 gl r dual cab with extras tow bar, canopy, bonnet protector, floor mats, all terrain tyres, spotlights, canvas seat covers, bull bar, overRail tub liner and all on road costs for 50 k drive away.
    Can someone plz let me know if this is a reasonable price or bit more than they would pay
  • Ros says,
    5 years ago
    Att Bunyip,

    Finally our new 2010 MN GLR Triton has arrived! Diesel 4x4, Cool silver, tinted windows, steel bullbar, tow bar, hightop canopy & tray liner.
    Very Impressed with the presentation & the room inside of the Hight top Canopy. Measurments inside hightop canopy with tray liner.
    Approx measuements
    Length 1.48m
    Width 1.44m
    Height .97m

    Will be buying a reversing camera.
    Ute is smooth to change gears, seats are comfy & stereo is amazing for a standard stereo! 2nd gear has great power, much better then 1st gear.
    We have to travel over the 'rangers' alot here which is 15 minutes of very windy road and it handled it like a breeze, we felt comfortable and in control around each sharp corner.
  • Bluedog says,
    5 years ago
    Tossed up betwen an D-max,Navara,BT50 and Triton.

    Monday put my money down for a Triton GLR. With canopy,liner,weathershields and headlight protectors and usual dealer and government charges came to around $54,000. Trade in of 2008 Ford Escape ($19000) and Dealers discount of $7000, bought the changeover figure to $28,000. Assume that is reasonable.

    Everything sounded so good and reviews were positive (Outlander 4WD of the year). It was the room in the back seats that sold me, and the chance to be able to travel without having to put seats down for more storage room.

    Only real disappointment was no reading lights/sunglass holder-this is replaced with a puny digital clock.

    Cant wait to get into this vehicle - delivery expected next week.

    Hope to travel the Gibb River road next year on our second round Australia trip.

    Cheers.
  • leeskees says,
    5 years ago
    Hey guys, My Husband and I are considering buying the latest 2x4 GLR, but have heard from a mechanic friend to stay away from Triton deisel because of carbon build-up around 40000 klms, which would mean trouble with the engine down the track. But when we spoke to the salesman at mitsubishi, he told us the new system is different in this model and that problem will not occur. Can anyone please tell us who to believe because we obviously trust a good mechanics advice, but if the system has changed and is ok, this is the only concern we have about the Triton.
    Thank you for your help!!
  • says,
    4 years ago
    1 like
    No the problem will still occur i work at a mitsubishi dealership and we are replacing heaps of top manifolds because the vaccum feed is in a position closer to the throttle plate and has less chance of blocking the vaccum feed. I have replaced heaps of lower manifolds the manifold slowly closes up with carbon deposits reducing your air flow by up to half and also your ports in the head do the same ..it is a very serious problem caused by the EGR system . I have put a plate in between EGR so as to stop it from putting these gases back into the inlet manifold just to try it ..fixes surge and definetly stops gases flowing back into manifold and building carbon up. I hate the tritons now after seeing all this
  • says,
    4 years ago
    1 like

    Carbon accumulation seems a very serious problem for mitsubishi common rail diesels. Wynns have a solvent you add to fuel or direct through air intake. Is this a solution or another gim***? As owners should we get rid of these vehicles before the engines are crippled?
  • says,
    4 years ago
    1 like
    Ive just bought a gls 4x4 cab 09 mdl with a 3.2 would anyone know what Mitsubishi have done to the 2010 mdl to get a higher towing capacity and if it could be done to my 09 properly so the warranty wont get void
  • JABBA says,
    4 years ago
    1 like
    I have just purchased a GLX-R triton 4x4 and would like to put on 18" wheels that have extra width in them also, does anyone have any comment or suggestions?
  • says,
    4 years ago
    1 like
    I have just taken delivery of the 2010 GLR Active. I am a little dissapointed in the power out put especially when climing hills ( on road) towing 800kg trailer with breaks. The 4 speed auto is fine on the flat or with nothing on tow, but appears to be very limited under stress. Just wondering if anyone else has had similar issues
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