Mike Stevens | Jul 22, 2009

COSWORTH HAS MOVED to allay concerns its engines will not be competitive when the company returns to the Formula One scene next season.

The company is set to provide a power plant to the three new outfits granted an entry by the FIA - Campos Meta 1, USF1 and Manor - but concerns have recently risen regarding the performance of its V8 engine.

Teams boasting Cosworth engines had initially been granted dispensation to run them up to 20,000rpm, in an attempt to compensate for an expected lack of power next season.

However, Cosworth agreed to scrap that concession after the FIA engaged in negotiations with FOTA to ward off the threat of a breakaway series, leaving the engines capped at 18,000rpm.

Cosworth’s Chief Executive Officer, Tim Routsis, believes the new teams will not be disadvantaged by the reduced output of the engine.

“We were confident that the engine in the return form would be utterly competitive providing we started early enough,” he told Autosport.

"I think the teams will not be any less competitive as a result of having a re-tuned engine. If anything, I think there are benefits to be had from reduced rejection of heat to oil, so radiators can get smaller, the drag goes down.

"Also, as an engine spins faster it consumed more fuel to overcome frictions, so by lowering the revs were are also going to improve the fuel efficiency.”

USF1

Routsis’ confidence is born from the results of an engine simulation Cosworth conducted on its 18,000rpm engine, which suggested it is capable of competing with the more-established manufacturers.

However, Routsis warned Cosworth may find itself in strife if FOTA and the FIA decide to cap the number of engines per car to five a season.

“Our position is that we are completely happy with this concept of reducing the revs to 18,000rpm but we only have a finite amount of time before we have to deliver engines," he said.

“There is not enough time for us to do a re-tune and extend the life of the engines. So we need to stay with the agreed number of eight engines."

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