Mike Stevens | Jun 24, 2009

FIA PRESIDENT Max Mosley insists he will not be forced out of motorsport’s top job, despite pressure from the Formula One Teams Association.

After initially declaring he would stand down from office in the wake of the News of the World sex scandal, Mosley has now written a letter to national motorsport federations claiming he will consider standing for re-election in October.

Mosley said FOTA has no right to dictate and influence governance of motorsport around the world, stating the teams attack on his leadership is tantamount to a challenge to the entire FIA.

“Over recent weeks it has become increasingly clear that one of the objectives of the dissident teams is that I should resign as president of the FIA,” he wrote.

“Last year you offered me your confidence and, as I wrote to you on May 16, 2008, it was my intention not to seek re-election in October this year.

“However, in light of the attack on the mandate you have entrusted to me, I must now reflect on whether my original decision not to stand for re-election was indeed the right one.

"It is for the FIA membership, and the FIA membership alone, to decide on its democratically elected leadership, not the motor industry and still less the individuals the industry employs to run its Formula 1 teams.”

FIA boss Max Mosley.
FIA boss Max Mosley.

Mosley also told FIA-aligned federations he doubts the manufacturers involved in the proposed FOTA championship possess the financial muscle necessary to launch a rival competition, reiterating his belief that independent outfits are the lifeblood of Formula 1.

"The catalyst for the current dispute was the FIA's attempts to reduce costs in Formula 1. A reduction in costs is essential if the independent teams are to survive,” he said.

"Without the independent teams, the championship would depend entirely on the car manufacturers who, of course, have always come and gone as it suited them.

"It is extraordinary that at a time when all five manufacturers involved are in great financial difficulty and relying on taxpayers money, their Formula 1 teams should threaten a breakaway series in order to avoid reducing their Formula 1 costs.

"It remains to be seen whether the boards of the parent companies will allow precious resources to be wasted in this way.”

Mosley’s letter contradicts a recent statement he made when speaking to the BBC at the British Grand Prix, where the Briton said he was prepared to stand down to accelerate the peace process, if necessary.

However, he may not have a choice in the matter after a meeting of the World Motor Sport Council (WMSC) tonight where it is believed Ferrari and FOTA boss Luca di Montezemolo will implore the FIA to force Mosley out.

While the meeting was initially called to confirm the final entry list for the 2010 championship, it now appears the WMSC’s gathering could ultimately dictate the future of Formula 1 and potentially accelerate the launch of a breakaway series.

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