Mike Stevens | Jun 2, 2009

ACCORDING TO RESEARCH undertaken by Australian insurer AAMI, men are twice as likely as women to fall asleep at the wheel, drive four or more hours without a break, and to cause a crash through fatigue.

The findings show that almost 72 percent of men would drive 2.5 hours or more without a break, compared to less than 60 percent of women.

“Even more alarming is that men are twice as likely as women to drive four hours or more without a rest (30 percent of men compared to 16 percent of women), particularly when you consider the vast distances Australians are prepared to drive to visit family and friends.”

“Along with speed and alcohol, fatigue is one of the main contributors to road fatalities and injuries,” Mr Durakovic said.

drowsy-driver_02 Mr Durakovic said that, despite reductions in deaths on Australian roads, one in five road fatalities can be linked to fatigue.

AAMI’s figures showed that 13 percent of men attribute crashes they have had to fatigue, compared to seven percent for women.

Mr Durakovic said that the study wasn’t intended to suggest women are better-suited to driving than men, but to make a point of the importance of staying fresh and rested on long drives.

AAMI is hopeful that the study will spur Queen’s Birthday holiday travellers to take advantage of the Driver Reviver sites that will be in operation across Australia this coming long weekend.

“Australians are no strangers to Driver Reviver sites and while it is pleasing that three in five have stopped and used one in the past, we would like to see that increase,” Mr Durakovic said.

“Police, emergency services and SES volunteers put in a huge effort to help improve safety for all road users and there can be no better way to repay them than by resting at a site and saying ‘thanks’.”

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