Mike Stevens | May 5, 2009

Formula One’s 2010 makeover has continued with the FIA approving the introduction of a ‘winner takes all’ system to decide the driver’s championship.

Bernie Ecclestone initially planned for the concept to be launched this season, only for the Formula One Teams Association to veto it on the eve of the opening round in Melbourne.

The FIA’s World Motor Sport Council approved the idea, having being told by Eccelstone that FOTA had given the system its approval.

But after it became clear the teams were in fact unanimously opposed to the proposal, the WMSC repealed any amendments made to the sporting regulations.

At the height of the controversy, FIA President Max Mosley said to the Daily Telegraph: “Bernie told me that he talked to all the teams and everybody was happy.

“I was led to believe they all agreed. The World Council was under the impression that they had all agreed.”

Despite then pleading ignorance, the uproar caused in March hasn’t deterred the FIA, who has now included the system in its new set of rules released last week - without consulting FOTA.

Article 6.1 of the 2010 Formula One Sporting Regulations state:

“The Formula One World Championship driver's title will be awarded to the driver who has been classified first in the greatest number of races, all official results from the Championship season being taken into account... in the event that two or more drivers win an equal number of races, the driver with the greatest number of points will be awarded the driver’s title.

“Points will be used to establish the remaining overall Championship standings.”

Most WMSC mandated amendments were highlighted in the new regulations to assist journalists in identifying changes made.

The FIA though chose not to alert the media to the presence of Article 6.1, raising questions over its motives.

Let the conspiracy theories commence at once.

Follow Mike Stevens on Google+