Mike Stevens | Mar 28, 2009

Grand Prix Drivers' Association director Mark Webber admits he is concerned by news that track marshals will need to wear rubber gloves as a precaution following the introduction of KERS technology (Kinetic Energy Recovery System) by some teams.

During the F1 off-season, a BMW-Sauber mechanic was hospitalised after receiving a severe electric shock as the car pitted, prompting the introduction of safety measures aimed at reducing the chance of such an incident reoccurring.

However, concerns have now been raised over the potential delays and inconvenience the gloves will cause in an emergency situation.

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Webber admitted the issue has been discussed, but he said that the drivers had been reassured the gloves will not be too much of a hindrance

“Obviously if there is a large accident, like Robert's for example (during Canada '07), and we need pretty good medical attention and very fast, it has been mentioned a while ago that we would like it to be addressed,” he said.

“They're pretty sure that they have the right type of gloves to still do the procedures that they need to do quite quickly, the important procedures that they need to do at the scene of such an accident, to make sure everything's OK, so hopefully we don't have to experience that at all.”

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Only seven cars on the F1 grid are fitted with the KERS system, and Webber hopes marshals will take this into account when attending the scene of an accident.

He said: “As usual, you do gain knowledge and experience sometimes on the front line, so we will see how it goes. I think that there's not many cars with KERS anyway, so hopefully they will have some common sense that they know that the cars with KERS, the cars without KERS, can be treated a bit differently in the case of a panic or an emergency.”

Come tomorrow, you would have to think that the last thing on Webber's mind will be whether or not marshalls have the right rubber gloves on. Nailing his home grand prix might just sneak in ahead of such concerns.

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