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Steane Klose | Nov 21, 2008

You read that headline right. Nissan will be removing the launch control function for 2010 model R35 GT-Rs, citing warranty issues as the main reason behind the decision. The bad publicity from busted gearboxes hardly helped the new GT-Rs cause. Looks like rumours the Australian model would be missing out on LC were spot on.

A top-level Nissan executive confirmed the news:

"It's gone. We just don't want to deal with the warranty nightmare anymore. It'll make the 2009 GT-R really special. It'll be the only R35 with launch control."

We're expecting that a revision to the GT-Rs 0-100km/h time will be in order.

Dropping the launch control will also ensure owners do not unnecessarily disable the Vehicle Dynamics Control system (a must for using launch control and a key point in Nissan's voiding of warranties on damaged transmissions). According to Nissan, VDC should only be disabled to rock the car back and forth in low traction conditions such as snow and mud.

r35_drivetrain

In addition, Nissan has also detailed additional changes to the upcoming Series II R35 GT-R. Prices will jump by ten percent (not five as previously reported), brake hose stiffness will be increased, and there's a wheel colour change in the works.

The price of the premium silver paint (Ultimate Silver) will rise around AUD$890, and Nissan has confirmed that the white paint scheme will be shared with the upcoming 370Z (some confusion surrounds the naming but Brilliant Pearl White looks to be accurate). Further more, the Black edition GT-R will now receive Dunlop tyres with Bridgestones as an option.

Rumored but unconfirmed changes include European suspension fitted to the Japanese model, iPod adaptor and MFD functions from the US version to be added to the Japanese version, and Circuit mode enabled for more locations.

Despite the lack of the launch-control the GT-R will still be a force to reckoned with, but if the removal of this function is more about protecting a potentially weak gearbox then we'd like to see Nissan addressing this issue directly. How a business handles itself when something "ain't quite right" can be just as important as the products it puts out.

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